While discussing the Receiver's long-in-the works new album All Burn, singer/keyboardist/bassist Casey Cooper occasionally comes across like a meteorologist in the midst of relaying a seven-day forecast.

While discussing the Receiver's long-in-the works new album All Burn, singer/keyboardist/bassist Casey Cooper occasionally comes across like a meteorologist in the midst of relaying a seven-day forecast.

"On the title track, it was almost like I could sense a storm before it was hitting; it was in the air," said Cooper, 34, who joined his brother, drummer/singer Jesse Cooper, 38, for an early May interview at a Bexley coffee shop.

It's a fitting image too, considering the duo's lush synth-rock is wholly capable of generating its own atmosphere, building on dreamy layers of synthesizer, gently undulating bass, propulsive drums and Casey's warm, enveloping vocals, which tend to drift across the musical landscape like a soft spring breeze.

While the sonic backdrop might evoke complex weather systems, influenced at least in part by the frontman's work on movie scores for experimental filmmaker Jennifer Reeder, the songs populating All Burn are more internal, largely tracing the arc of a romantic relationship as it traverses a series of ups and downs.

"It's a little revealing, but I wanted it to be genuine and I didn't want to sugarcoat it too much," said Casey, who joins his brother for a record release show at Ace of Cups on Friday, June 19. "I think people appreciate songwriters being genuine about what they go through. We're all human and we all go through the same types of emotional heartaches and breakdowns."

Even as Casey struggles with uncertainty, anger, bitterness and self-doubt - "I'm sorry if I'm not who I should be these days," he sings on "Drift" - the music maintains a sense of optimism that carries through to the closing "These Days," easily the album's most upbeat cut sonically.

"There's a lot of negativity in the songs, but the whole album is supposed to be laced with a sense of hope and a sense that things are going to get better," said Casey, who has now been making music with his brother in the Receiver for a decade.

It's this familial bond - not the romantic one at the core of All Burn - that exerts the heaviest pull on the band's music, with Jesse's love for live performance offering the ideal counterbalance to Casey's fondness for studio experimentation.

"I'd be content to sit in my room and write the rest of my life; he'd be content to be up on the stage playing for the rest of his life," Casey said. "I could sit around and write lofty, ambient music all day … but it's not conducive to a band and it's not conducive to live performance. Knowing the end result has to include a pulse and a rhythm is always in the back of my mind when I'm writing. I know if it's upbeat Jess will perk up right away."