Michael Rault's new album, Living Daylight, kicks off with a quandary many 9-to-5ers wrestle with as each Friday night rolls around. "I'm so tired/I don't want to go out," he sings, "[But] I don't want to stay in alone." Throughout, the Toronto-based singer/songwriter struggles to adapt to the mounting changes brought on by adulthood, wondering when everything will start to make sense (answer: never) and adjusting to big-city life away from his childhood home in Edmonton.

Michael Rault's new album, Living Daylight, kicks off with a quandary many 9-to-5ers wrestle with as each Friday night rolls around. "I'm so tired/I don't want to go out," he sings, "[But] I don't want to stay in alone." Throughout, the Toronto-based singer/songwriter struggles to adapt to the mounting changes brought on by adulthood, wondering when everything will start to make sense (answer: never) and adjusting to big-city life away from his childhood home in Edmonton.

Similarly conflicted thoughts bleed into even the album's more heartfelt tunes, such as "Lovers Lie," an airy ballad where his affections continue to grow even in the face of repeated deception. "Every step and breath I take, I'm more in love with you," he confesses atop synthesizers that flutter like multihued butterflies.

Even at its most reflective, however, the music maintains a sense of momentum, and tracks flirt with glam-pop, '60s garage and glittery psychedelia. Note "Real Love," which struts along on a fuzzed-out, T. Rex-worthy guitar riff, or the trippy "Dancing with Tears in My Eyes," which cries out for the same animated treatment applied to the equally loopy, Beatles-inspired "Yellow Submarine."

Nasty Habit and Happyness also perform.