Despite its name, I can tick off several ways that Taco Loco isn't crazy. For example, the five-month-old place occupies a nondescript space - albeit roomy and clean - in the Bethel Sawmill Center (where it shares owners with the wonderful Diamonds Ice Cream parlor right next door). And Taco Loco offers a fairly routine, casual-Mexican-restaurant menu packed with tacos, burritos and fajitas. Its food is promptly delivered without incident and prices are reasonable.

Despite its name, I can tick off several ways that Taco Loco isn't crazy. For example, the five-month-old place occupies a nondescript space - albeit roomy and clean - in the Bethel Sawmill Center (where it shares owners with the wonderful Diamonds Ice Cream parlor right next door). And Taco Loco offers a fairly routine, casual-Mexican-restaurant menu packed with tacos, burritos and fajitas. Its food is promptly delivered without incident and prices are reasonable.

So why "Loco?" Maybe it's because servers try like crazy to please their patrons, or maybe it's because some dishes are crazy-good.

Taco Loco's counter system is efficient, but upon entering, you'll be immediately faced with an expansive menu augmented by chalkboard specials, some of which are written in Spanish. It's a lot to absorb while an eager server is itching to take your order. So going in with a gameplan is advised.

That plan should include the Guacamole Dip ($4). It's big, fresh, correctly textured (not a puree) and properly made with cilantro, onion, tomato and lime. If you like it spicy, tables are equipped with bowls holding pickled chilies and onions - a face-blazing garnish that should be used with utmost caution.

Either way, the guacamole goes great with a Mexican beer such as a Dos Equis or Negra Modelo ($5 for a 21-ounce draft). If you prefer a margarita, Taco Loco's enormous "jumbos" are undistinguished, but a great deal at $6 - and the bicep workout is free.

Several tacos are available "street style" - meaning served in warm, soft corn tortillas sprinkled with diced raw onion and cilantro. One I tried was all right (grilled lime chicken), but two were crazy-good: the tangy and tender pork al pastor and the birria (juicy, pot roast-type meat in a zesty red sauce). Served with diced cucumbers plus radish and lime wheels, as well as a side - get the creamy, deep-flavored refried beans - tacos come three per order ($8.50), and can be mix-and-match.

For more crazy-good fare, target the Torta Loca ($10 with OK fries). It's a messy but fantastic Mexican submarine sandwich that loads assorted taco meats - grilled steak, slow-cooked beef, marinated chicken and pork - into a terrific bolillo roll with a brittle shell that's welcomingly soft underneath. This "everything but the cocina sink" behemoth also includes beans, avocado, lettuce, tomato, onion and mayo.

Carnitas are delicious pork shoulder pieces that need to be long-simmered to become succulent, but also require a high-heat crisping for the crinkly exterior that makes them so fun to eat. This presents a cooked-to-order problem for many restaurants. Taco Loco has cleverly solved it by presenting their tender Carnitas ($11) fajitas-style on a sizzling platter. Like other entrees, it's served with warm tortillas, refried beans plus garlicky Mexican rice tricked out with vegetables, but sometimes dry.

The same rice and a fresh house salad that amusingly resembles the Mexican flag (with carefully arranged romaine lettuce, sour cream, diced cucumbers and tomatoes) accompany El Chavo ("the kid," $11). This is an appealing open-faced taco sandwich that layers grilled chicken, good chorizo, melted cheeses and chopped pineapple above griddled tortillas.

Like El Chavo, Camarones Jalisco ($12, an off-menu special served with rice and beans) veered into dexterous Tex-Mex territory. About a dozen respectable shrimp were swamped in a thick-yet-zingy sauce that tastes like a blend of queso dip and ranchero sauce. It's hardly remarkable, but if you're in the mood for cheesy, guilty pleasure-type seafood, you'd be crazy not to try it.