Betsy Ross was a Philadelphia-born upholsterer who sewed the first American flag in 1776. But around Columbus, her name has recently become synonymous with an indie rock band, made up of singer/guitarist Charity Crowe, 22; her bassist brother Schuyler Crowe, 24; and drummer David Wegner, also 24.

Betsy Ross was a Philadelphia-born upholsterer who sewed the first American flag in 1776. But around Columbus, her name has recently become synonymous with an indie rock band, made up of singer/guitarist Charity Crowe, 22; her bassist brother Schuyler Crowe, 24; and drummer David Wegner, also 24.

"Originally, when we thought of the band name, we wanted something that was cohesive," said Schuyler Crowe, seated next to Charity, over beers on a recent evening at Olde Towne East's Carabar.

"We wanted something vintage, American and related to Ohio. We thought Betsy Ross was from Ohio. She's not, we learned later, but it was too late at that point." he said with a laugh.

Betsy Ross, the band, will release its first full-length album, "Dead Wild," on Saturday, Aug. 15, and will celebrate with a blowout party at Skully's Music-Diner.

The trio's previous release, a self-titled 2014 EP, featured four high-energy indie rock tunes (led by Charity Crowe's powerful, wailing vocals), which quickly earned the band a devoted local following. They recorded "Dead Wild" over a period of about six months at Oranjudio in Grandview Heights with producer and engineer Brandon Maclean. The Crowe siblings agreed that throughout the process of creating this album, the band made significant strides together emotionally, musically and lyrically.

"We're getting a lot more comfortable. It's very visceral," Charity said. "We're pushing ourselves a lot more. None of us have been playing for too terribly long on our own. You can definitely tell toward the end of the album that we're reaching and trying new techniques on guitar and bass."

The band's sonic evolution was inspired, at least in part, by "a time where I was listening to way too much of the National - like, an absurd amount of the National," Charity explained, laughing. "And it made me want to break from just the really fast, slammy stuff [on the EP], to slowing down and realizing that you don't have to play hard to have energy. If you're doing it well, people are still going to listen, even if you are not screaming at them. And if you have good lyrics and people can tell that you are actually feeling them, it makes up for all of that loss of slamming energy."

For the album release party, Schuyler said the group wanted "to make it a standalone event – something that we could remember for a long time and something that we could be proud of. At the root of it, it's a bunch of our friends coming out." They've invited some of their closest musical friends to perform for the occasion: Lancaster-based progressive gypsy rock band Fisher, local indie rockers Yellow Paper Planes, Dayton's hard-rocking Good English, pop-rock band the Candescents, rockers the Up All Nights and "witch rock" band Damn the Witch Siren.

Friendships are something Betsy Ross can't collect fast enough these days. "We would like to be friends with everybody. We don't keep our fans at an arm's length," Schuyler said.

Charity chimed in: "It's more of, like, a kissing length."