When "Wet Hot American Summer" premiered more than 10 years ago, it was hardly a critical or commercial success, though it was surely adored by fans of "The State," as many alums of the beloved cult series star in it. Since then, the film gained its own cult following - a gaggle that devoutly loves and can recite every line - and many of its cast (Amy Poehler, Bradley Cooper, Paul Rudd, Elizabeth Banks and Christopher Meloni) have become big stars.

When "Wet Hot American Summer" premiered more than 10 years ago, it was hardly a critical or commercial success, though it was surely adored by fans of "The State," as many alums of the beloved cult series star in it. Since then, the film gained its own cult following - a gaggle that devoutly loves and can recite every line - and many of its cast (Amy Poehler, Bradley Cooper, Paul Rudd, Elizabeth Banks and Christopher Meloni) have become big stars.

So finally a reunion of all those involved - from the big-name stars to creators Michael Showalter and David Wain - has occurred with Netflix's eight-episodes of "Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp."

If you've never seen the "Wet Hot" movie, don't watch the series until you have. The day-in-the-life of a summer camp flick - think "Meatballs"-meets-"Dazed and Confused" - is also streaming on Netflix.

If you have seen the film, you know the only defining characteristic in this world is absurdity - hence, a cast that was nowhere near teenaged 10 years ago, despite playing 16-year-old camp counselors. So having it take place months before the film version despite the cast aging almost 15 years since the original kind of makes sense?

Yes, the "Wet Hot" Netflix series is probably more ridiculous than the movie - and not just because there's an extra two-plus hours. The series is also downright hilarious and frankly quite stupid (in a very fun way).

The "backstories" of characters from the film, the timeline of events (even more happens in one day, including the entirety of a landmark court case) and the perfectly cast cameos and guest stars make the series sillier and funnier, at times.

The jokes come rapid-fire here, so when there's one that doesn't work, it doesn't matter. The next one is immediate, and it's rare there are two misfires in a row.

And when it does work, it's frickin' hilarious. I was particularly pleased with "Mad Men" guest stars Jon Hamm and especially John Slattery. But the original characters get plenty to do - including an expanded role for Christopher Meloni's Jonas/Gene - along with a lot of wonderful callbacks to the film.