There's a long-standing tendency to romanticize the life of the writer - one often fraught with rejection and self-doubt, even among those who possess a generational talent, such as that held by the late David Foster Wallace.

There's a long-standing tendency to romanticize the life of the writer - one often fraught with rejection and self-doubt, even among those who possess a generational talent, such as that held by the late David Foster Wallace.

The culprit for this romanticizing is likely the fact that, well, writers write about writers. "The End of the Tour" is a film adaptation of a memoir written by a journalist about his time with a writer. That's a lot of layers in that onion.

But the film's unconventional narrative makes it both a fitting tribute to Wallace and an engaging exploration of the human condition - all through the eyes of two writers.

The film fittingly opens on the sounds of someone typing on a keyboard. As writer-journalist David Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg) learns of the death of Wallace, he dusts off the old recordings of an interview he did with the author for Rolling Stone right after the publication of Wallace's groundbreaking 1996 novel, "Infinite Jest."

A younger Lipsky pitches the piece to a reluctant editor ("This is the sort of stuff I should be doing, not 500 words on boy bands.") and then drives off to meet a reluctant Wallace (Jason Segal).

The two spend the next five days together during Wallace's book tour for "Jest" in a fascinating trip that blurs the lines between friend and adversary, all under the umbrella of two writers speaking about both craft and experience.

"The End of the Tour" is so tightly focused on this trip that it sidesteps some of the traditional pitfalls of a biopic. This is meant to be a slice of Wallace through the perspective of a man who only knew him through a magazine assignment - and we learn much about Lipsky's own issues of confidence in facing a brilliant writer.

This is essentially a two-man show, so it's safe to say the movie will be as good as those performances - which are both excellent. Eisenberg's nebbish and polite demeanor masks the more complex turnings beneath (much like his role in "The Social Network").

But it's Segal who leaves the biggest impression in a charming yet complex performance that's far more subtle and layered than you'd expect from an actor who's done almost exclusively comedy.

Director James Ponsoldt (who did the excellent and underseen "The Spectacular Now") finds a wealth of emotion in a movie that is almost entirely just the conversations of two people and generally avoids any heavy-handed foreshadowing of Wallace's eventual death by suicide.

"The End of the Tour" is a dissection of both the mind of a writer and the nature of an interviewer. This writer recommends it.