Cherry Chrome rarely gets to play for an audience of its peers, but that's precisely what happened when the self-described "spunk rock" quartet tore through a pair of songs during a lunch break at Grrrls Rock Columbus earlier this summer.

Cherry Chrome rarely gets to play for an audience of its peers, but that's precisely what happened when the self-described "spunk rock" quartet tore through a pair of songs during a lunch break at Grrrls Rock Columbus earlier this summer.

"I thought it was cool because I'm the same age as those campers [who ranged from the age of 12 through 18]," said Cherry Chrome singer/guitarist Xenia Bleveans-Holm, 16, who joins her drummer father David, as well as bandmates Mick Martinez (guitar) and Amina Adesini (bass) for an Ace of Cups concert on Friday, Sept. 4 (the show is part of the multiday, multi-venue FemmeFest, now in its second year). "I like seeing musicians closer to my age because it feels more accessible than listening to bands that are twice your age. There's this unspoken thing you can't do anything until you're 25 … and I think it's cool when musicians get to do things when they're super young."

Of course, being young comes with its own setbacks - namely the pressures of high school - and during a late August interview at an Olde Towne East coffee shop Bleveans-Holm expressed some dismay that junior-year classes could curtail band activity just as the crew puts the finishing touches on its debut EP.

"I'm really not very good at balance, and it's hard to prioritize the school things I don't want to do," she said, laughing.

Cherry Chrome started recording its debut in September 2014, roughly a month after the band solidified its current lineup (a fundraiser to help fund the EP release is scheduled to take place at Kafe Kerouac on Friday, Sept. 11). As a result, the Columbus native said the earliest versions of songs capture the sound of a band still finding its footing - something that has become significantly less of a concern in recent months.

"If you listen back to some of those early recordings, we play them different now," said Bleveans-Holm, who was born and raised in a musical family and penned her earliest songs the summer after eighth grade. "I guess we just play with more confidence; we all know what we're doing better now."