When it came time to record its most recent album, Foil Deer, released earlier this year, the bandmates in Massachusetts-based guitar-rock quartet Speedy Ortiz opted to slow things down.

When it came time to record its most recent album, Foil Deer, released earlier this year, the bandmates in Massachusetts-based guitar-rock quartet Speedy Ortiz opted to slow things down.

"We were full-time musicians when we made this record, which hadn't ever been true, so we were able to take our time and do it exactly how we imagined it," said singer/guitarist Sadie Dupuis, who joins her bandmates for a concert at Double Happiness on Tuesday, Sept. 8. "With the last record (Major Arcana, from 2013), all we could afford was four days in the studio, and even with that people were leaving to go to their jobs. [Bassist] Darl [Ferm] was delivering pizzas, and I had to go teach class at [the University of Massachusetts at Amherst], so we were really stretched for time. With this one, we booked a solid three weeks [at the Rare Book Room in Brooklyn] and made sure everything from the tones to the playing to the mixing was right."

The resulting songs, in turn, tend to be slower and crisper than previous recordings, colored with menacing electronic drums ("Puffer"), slinky synthesizers ("Dot X") and knotty guitar duels that unfurl slowly (the patient, layered "My Dead Girl") or hit with wood-chipper authority ("Swell Content" builds around a twisting guitar squall that could have listeners seeking out basement refuge).

Lyrically, Dupois, who officially left her job as a college professor early in 2014, appears to have purged some of the resentment that embedded itself in Major Arcana - "That album is pretty angry, and I'm not so much that way anymore," she said - though her words still wield impressive force. "If you wanna throw," Dupuis sings amidst the guitar churn of "Raising the Skate," "you better have an awfully big stone."

Many of Foil Deer's tracks were written as Dupuis ran, biked and swam in the Connecticut wilds, and the singer credits this fitness regime with helping restore a sense of balance and allowing her to let go of past grudges.

"I'd had a rough year and was trying to get a little healthier physically and mentally," said Dupuis, who was born and raised in a heavily musical family (her mother briefly worked for Punk Magazine in addition to logging time as an assistant to Waylon Jennings manager, and her father worked in label A&R and later played a role in helping found the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, according to the singer). "Physical health translates to creative ideas, so some of the songs I wrote while swimming took on the pace of whatever the strokes were - the same with biking and running - and that seems like a healthier place to direct your anger and energy."