As many of you know, I'm a whiskey guy. So when a kind gentleman brought me a bottle from up-and-coming Journeymen Distillery out of Three Oaks, Michigan, I was excited to give it a shot. I'm almost strictly one of those who believe bourbon only comes from Kentucky, but there have been a few rare occasions where a product outside the Bluegrass State can measure up.

As many of you know, I'm a whiskey guy. So when a kind gentleman brought me a bottle from up-and-coming Journeymen Distillery out of Three Oaks, Michigan, I was excited to give it a shot. I'm almost strictly one of those who believe bourbon only comes from Kentucky, but there have been a few rare occasions where a product outside the Bluegrass State can measure up.

When it comes to Journeymen's Featherbone Bourbon, the whiskey doesn't quite match the elite bourbons - or even some of the underrated, mid-price versions - out of Kentucky, but it is a solid effort worth trying.

The Featherbone Bourbon is a fairly tradition bourbon recipe using locally-grown, organic-certified corn and wheat - a practice the company is dedicated to - and a sprinkle of rye and barley malt. The result is a solidly smooth bourbon that has an initial gust of corn flavor. Thankfully, this quickly fades and a nice sweetness (with a finish of pepper and tobacco) balances the flavor profile.

The 90-proof bourbon is a little too bold at first - it's best with a splash of water or an ice cube - but it mellows out nicely once the more restrained notes come through.

Where the Featherbone Bourbon's biggest flaw lies is in its "age." Given that Journeymen opened in 2011, none of their products - nearly 20 different spirits - can have been barrel-aged for very long. This is very noticeable - even more so than the copious corn - as the hefty alcohol bite is brusque and the flavors don't blend as well as they could. Each sip is kind of like: woof, big booze, some very pleasant sweet and smoky elements, followed by a spicy finish.

I hope, and am almost certain, the distillery is further aging some of its whiskey products, and I highly anticipate the release of those (potentially in five to eight years). Still, this is a solid bourbon and shows Journeymen has potential. I will definitely try the southwest Michigan distillery's Last Feather Rye and Silver Cross Whiskey, and probably one or two of their clear spirits.