Figlio Wood Fired Pizza doesn't offer tacos, pho, ramen, a wall of beer taps or house pickles. In fact, the original Figlio in Grandview (there are siblings in Upper Arlington and Dayton) seems so unconcerned with fickle dining trends that it hasn't appreciably altered its menu since opening in 1991.

Figlio Wood Fired Pizza doesn't offer tacos, pho, ramen, a wall of beer taps or house pickles. In fact, the original Figlio in Grandview (there are siblings in Upper Arlington and Dayton) seems so unconcerned with fickle dining trends that it hasn't appreciably altered its menu since opening in 1991.

Operating outside the realm of buzz as it does, Figlio doesn't get much press or social media attention. But any time you visit the little "Cal-Ital"-style pizza and pasta specialist, you'll encounter a smiling crowd. I can only conclude that fresh, reliably good, straightforward food never goes out of style.

Here's what else never gets stale: a well-located patio, bustling open kitchen, lilting pop music with Brazilian and jazzy sensibilities, tasteful and cozy digs plus friendly and capable service.

Wine is the featured drink. Most bottles clock in around $30, are food-friendly, and come with idiosyncratic descriptions that reference cars, movies, neighborhood shops and a leisurely lifestyle. Similar to its cuisine, many of Figlio's wines can trace their roots to California, and are meant for everyday, rather than special-occasion, consumption.

Cocktails aren't totally neglected, and a potent nightly special - an OYO Stonefruit martini ($9, OYO vodka, elderflower liqueur, Cointreau, "almond essence" and muddled orange) - had ribbons of lemon peel plus the color and refreshing flavor of pink grapefruit.

Bread service comes with a flourish. It's slices of homemade focaccia and an Italian-style loaf partnered with a saucer of sundried tomatoes and herbs (primarily basil and rosemary) over which green olive oil is poured.

If you'd like a starter, it'll be a salad, and probably a good one. Expect a properly chilled plate, homemade croutons and the offer of freshly cracked black pepper. I enjoyed the fine Balsamic Salad ($6.75) - a harmonious medley of lettuces, toasted pine nuts, gorgonzola crumbles and sundried tomatoes. But the excellent Caesar ($6.25) starring a light, lemony, garlicky and anchovy-accented vinaigrette was even more impressive.

Figlio's pizzas are top-tier, too. They arrive from a hardworking, hearthlike oven with judiciously applied toppings above thin and crisp crusts that are attractively puffy, charred and smoke-scented toward the edge.

The Spring Chicken ($13) bears the description "New!" as well as more supple poultry and better quality cheese (Vermont cheddar) than what you usually get on pizzas. Decorated with herbs, chopped tomato, sweet corn, roasted red pepper, avocado and a creamy pesto sauce, it's a light and lively celebration of the warmer months.

Another new entree sounded heavy - the meat-and-potatoes Beef Tenderloin and Mushroom Saute ($17.25) - but didn't come off leaden. Skillfully crusted slices of tender beef with ruby centers were fanned-out in a colorful presentation that included asparagus spears plus a loose hash of diced spuds, crimini mushrooms, chopped tomatoes and spinach. Tying everything together was a lightly creamy, wine-inflected "peppercorn sauce" and gorgonzola sprinkles.

Salmon, Shrimp and Scallop Provencal ($19.50) is the only other "new" menu item, and it's likewise a winner. Combining good seafood, al dente linguine, a zingy tomato sauce, capers and fresh basil, it's another tried-and-true ensemble.

But, for that price, I wish it had more than one big scallop. And I wish the presentation and dressing of a Caprese-style salad special ($7) hadn't been uncharacteristically heavy-handed. I also wish the description of the "housemade spicy fennel sausage" matched the sausage on my still-terrific pizza, which was fresh and delicious, but absent spice and fennel.

While toppling a towering slice of irresistible homemade Double Chocolate Red Velvet Cake ($6.50) flaunting white chocolate filling and dark chocolate/sour cream frosting, though, I went back to just wishing more restaurants grasped Figlio's deeply satisfying ways with classic flavor combinations.