The Motel Beds traditionally turns around albums with a speed that falls in line with its short-stay endorsing name.

The Motel Beds traditionally turns around albums with a speed that falls in line with its short-stay endorsing name.

But for the band's most recent full-length, Mind Glitter (Anyway Records), the Dayton garage rockers slowed the pace significantly, spending months at a time writing and reshaping new material while promoting and touring extensively behind These Are the Days Gone By, a compilation album released late in the summer of 2014.

"We had a little more time to labor over it - for better or for worse," said Tommy Cooper, 35, who joins his bandmates for a concert at Ace of Cups on Saturday, Oct. 24. "Usually we lay stuff to tape quickly and move on, but with this ... we were able to start recording and try different angles. It was nice to mix it up, but I'm sure next time we'll do something a little more stripped-down and immediate."

Mind Glitter, in contrast, stands among the crew's densest, most diverse efforts, swinging between bursts of melodic, Beach Boys-esque surf rock ("Queens for the Summer") and scrappier turns like "A.O.O.," a nervy rocker built around shaggy instrumentation as tousled and unkempt as bedhead.

"Over the last couple years we've kind of been doing a song at a time and letting it be whatever it's going to be," said Cooper, who launched Motel Beds as an acoustic duo with singer PJ Paslosky (the group currently operates as a quintet). "There're five of us, and we all have our own tastes and personalities, so a lot of it came down to gut instinct."

The process resulted with a wealth of material - it wasn't unusual for the bandmates to record two or three entirely different versions of the same song - and there are developing plans for a cassette release featuring alternate takes of each album track ("We're putting out a second version of the album, in that sense," Cooper said).

Moving forward, Cooper expects Motel Beds to resume its album-a-year pace, noting the musicians are far more motivated these days than when they first started the band over a decade back.

"It was really just a hobby at that point. We could play to a bunch of people in our hometown every couple of months, but we were just having fun and not really trying to do anything," he said. "We're getting older now, and we can't do this forever, so we want to give it a good go and see what happens."