The bandmates in David Wax Museum adopted an academic moniker and trumpet the important role research plays in their creative process (the group's online biography makes note of singer David Wax's repeated trips to Mexico to study traditional music and culture). Even so, the Boston crew, anchored as always by the husband-wife team of Wax and Suz Slezak, never comes across as overly studious on its fifth album, Guesthouse, a heartfelt, largely acoustic effort that finds the musicians determined to engage rather than floating through the days detached and adrift.

The bandmates in David Wax Museum adopted an academic moniker and trumpet the important role research plays in their creative process (the group's online biography makes note of singer David Wax's repeated trips to Mexico to study traditional music and culture). Even so, the Boston crew, anchored as always by the husband-wife team of Wax and Suz Slezak, never comes across as overly studious on its fifth album, Guesthouse, a heartfelt, largely acoustic effort that finds the musicians determined to engage rather than floating through the days detached and adrift.

"At least while I'm here let me soak in the rain," Wax sings on "Lose Touch with the World," a song about doing precisely the opposite. "Let me hold my hand to the flame."

Musically, however, the album is more of a slow burn. Wax and Slezak, joined here by a trio of multi-instrumentalists - Jordan Wax (organ, piano, found sounds, etc.), Greg Glassman (bass, guitar, percussion, etc.) and Philip Mayer (drums, percussion, mouth harp, etc.) - compose self-described "Mexo-Americana" tracks that come on like Southwestern folk ditties. This is particularly true of "Everything Changes," an anxious-though-optimistic tune where the two confront parenthood for the first time. "Everything changes when two become three," they harmonize atop a lively tavern stomp that could rouse virtually any sleeping infant.

Anthony D'Amato opens the show.