Taco trucks are damn near ubiquitous in Columbus, but only one has managed to score the sombrero trick of 1) nabbing a stall in Ohio Stadium for Buckeye football games, 2) commanding a stand in the Schottenstein Center during basketball season and 3) snatching a high-profile space in the venerable North Market. That hard-working and business-savvy taco truck is Dos Hermanos.

Taco trucks are damn near ubiquitous in Columbus, but only one has managed to score the sombrero trick of 1) nabbing a stall in Ohio Stadium for Buckeye football games, 2) commanding a stand in the Schottenstein Center during basketball season and 3) snatching a high-profile space in the venerable North Market. That hard-working and business-savvy taco truck is Dos Hermanos.

I hadn't gotten a chance to try 3-year-old Dos Hermanos yet, so its new North Market gig provided me a convenient reason to finally get up to speed. Spoiler alert: It's pretty good, and even better with beer.

The little setup features "papel picado" banners (folk-arty tissue papers), a counter with four stools, Jarritos Mexican soda pops topped with tiny sombreros, and an eminently manageable menu. That's all nice, but what really impresses is service so warm and friendly that you want to order a lotta food - so I did.

Five meat fillings are available for tacos (1 for $3, 3 for $8), which are best selected Mexican street-style, i.e., in good and warm, soft corn tortillas garnished with onion and cilantro and served with lime, salsa (I liked the fruity hot version and the lightly creamy salsa verde, called "guacamole"), plus a blistered whole jalapeno that should be approached with caution. You can also get full-meal "Platos" with refried beans (rich and creamy) and rice (undistinguished) or just dabble on the cheap with a la carte items.

Dos Hermanos sells soda and agua fresca. Alternately, you can do what I cleverly did, and ferry your food to nearby Barrel and Bottle, where you can cop a squat on a communal table and pair your grub with a refreshing and compatible beer (e.g., Ploughshare Saison from Wolf's Ridge Brewing).

I enjoyed all three generously packed tacos I tried. Instead of ground sausage, the chorizo was chunks of stewy and zingy pork. The barbacoa was pot roast-like meat drenched in a zesty sauce. And the carnitas taco had pulled pork strands that were good-tasting and nicely textured, if a little dry.

Tamales ($3) were even more impressive. The supple and deeply comforting masa tubes come wrapped in banana leaves and are obviously handmade.

The Chile Relleno Plato ($13), starring a puffy-and-eggy-battered, smokily roasted poblano pepper swamped in spaghetti-style red sauce and melted cheese, was also a winner.