Cameron Mitchell Restaurants beverage director Ryan Valentine knows his way around a bar and its patrons. And he says we've entered a drinking era prime for flexibility and new discoveries. "Millennials like to try new stuff. One night, they go out and want beer, and the next night, they go out and they're interested in wine. Older people are a little more in a rut with what they like and just do the same thing," he said. To that end, we asked Valentine and Cris Dehlavi, one of the city's best bartenders, to suggest beers for those of us who like certain wines and vice versa. Here's their advice:

Cameron Mitchell Restaurants beverage director Ryan Valentine knows his way around a bar and its patrons. And he says we've entered a drinking era prime for flexibility and new discoveries. "Millennials like to try new stuff. One night, they go out and want beer, and the next night, they go out and they're interested in wine. Older people are a little more in a rut with what they like and just do the same thing," he said. To that end, we asked Valentine and Cris Dehlavi, one of the city's best bartenders, to suggest beers for those of us who like certain wines and vice versa. Here's their advice:

Flavor profile: Big, complex, assertive

If you love: Zinfandel, nebbiolo, cabernet sauvignon

Try: Porter, stout, English brown beer

"There are some things going on in these maltier beers that [are] not totally unlike the fruity flavor of bigger, richer wines," Valentine said. And, Dehlavi said, she knows plenty of drinkers who will move between big, malty beers and spicy, complex cocktails, like manhattans, because they have similar profiles.

Flavor profile: Medium-bodied, fruity, delicate

If you love: Pinot noir, Beaujolais, Chianti

Try: Amber or Vienna lager, pale ale

"An amber lager might be more along the delicate flavors of a pinot noir," Valentine said. "And a pale ale person might also be that pinot person." For beers, think Great Lakes Eliot Ness, Sarnac Nut Brown Lager, or Sierra Nevada Vienna Style Lager.

Flavor profile: Light, crisp, dry

If you love: Unoaked chardonnay, sauvignon blanc

Try: European pilsner, saison

"The pilsner is crisp and has enough hops to keep it nice and dry, so that kind of parlays into drier white wines," Valentine said. Adds Dehlavi: "I immediately think of Rockmill's saison because it's got a lot of complexity, but it's also light-bodied and so delicious." She also suggests these drinkers might enjoy one of the many fruit-based beers out there-think 21st Amendment's Hell or High Watermelon or a pumpkin ale.

The Outlier: Super-hoppy IPAs

Sorry, there is no wine equivalent to the extreme-bitter end of the beer spectrum. "I don't think there's a beautiful translation there," Valentine said.