Cordial Sins' singer/keyboardist Liz Fisher kicked off the band's Saturday performance at the Big Room Bar singing about the sun meeting her eyes, a fitting visual for "AM," a warm, inviting number that mirrored the feel of daybreak.

Cordial Sins' singer/keyboardist Liz Fisher kicked off the band's Saturday performance at the Big Room Bar singing about the sun meeting her eyes, a fitting visual for "AM," a warm, inviting number that mirrored the feel of daybreak.

The concert, a dual release show for Sins' new album Daze and Abandon Ship!, the latest long-player from raucous rock trio Friendly Faux, might've lasted only a few hours, but it still managed to stretch from morning through the wee hours of the night, with the Faux mates ripping through an abbreviated set that played like last call at a claustrophobic dive when compared with Cordial Sins' sunnier, daytime fare.

Fisher and bandmates Corey Dickerson (guitar/backing vocals), Kyle Edwards (guitar), Alex Randall (bass) and Jeremy Miller (drums) swung between pretty, laid-back tunes that lingered like those long summer days of childhood ("Sway") and more upbeat cuts like "Overboard," which shuffled along like a top deck dance-off. Though steeped in pop-rock tradition, the songs rarely traversed a straight line, and the bandmates frequently colored tracks with artier musical flourishes. Dickerson laced a jangly, loose-limbed "Dangerous State," for one, with reverberating guitar riffs that mimicked stones dropped one by one into a pond.

For the most part, Friendly Faux refrained from detail work in its ferocious headlining turn, with singer/guitarist Geoff Spall, drummer Brandyn Morit and bassist Charis Yost functioning as something of an industrial shredder on songs that grew increasingly unhinged as the set progressed. After opening with "Prophet Motive," a murkier number built on creeping guitar and even creepier lyrics ("Nobody here to hear when you scream"), the trio dispensed with the formalities. What followed were an assortment of fast, fuzzy rockers like "You Know Who You Are," which could've existed comfortably in the early '90s alt-rock era and found the band members bashing at their instruments so ferociously I half expected someone in the audience to start yelling "WorldStar" while filming the beat-down.

Similar contrasts played out between the evening's openers the Original Soundtrack and the Receiver, with the former remaining earthbound on a series of blues-stoked rockers and the latter drifting into the cosmos on the spacey, synth-driven tunes culled from its excellent new album All Burn, which surfaced earlier this year.