Despite Starbucks' best efforts, the holiday movie season kicks off this weekend with "Love the Coopers," a sentimental look at a dysfunctional family reuniting for the holidays. Such families are ripe movie fare. Here are some favorites.

Despite Starbucks’ best efforts, the holiday movie season kicks off this weekend with “Love the Coopers,” a sentimental look at a dysfunctional family reuniting for the holidays. Such families are ripe movie fare. Here are some favorites.

The Griswolds in "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation"

The mandatory fun of the original “Vacation” indicated a little dysfunction, but bringing the whole clan together for the holidays really brought it out across generations.

The Torrances in "The Shining"

A family getaway can be a good thing. A months-long family getaway in an isolated hotel built on a burial site? Not so much.

The Corleones in "The Godfather"

A lot of people feel pressure to go into the family business. It just usually involves fewer murders.

The Burnhams in "American Beauty"

For a movie built around things not being what they seem, this was the quintessential perfect family that was anything but.

The Tenenbaums in "The Royal Tenenbaums"

Wes Anderson teaches us that the children of dysfunctional parents grow up to be, wait for it, dysfunctional adults!

The Sawyers in "Texas Chainsaw Massacre"

The family that slays together stays together. This dysfunction was way worse on the victims. The Sawyers seem pretty happy with their deal.

The Berkmans in "The Squid and the Whale"

Noah Baumbach’s look at two young brothers coping with their intellectual parents’ intellectual divorce really resonates with children of divorce (which is a lot of people).

The Friedmans in "Capturing the Friedmans"

This documentary about a seemingly normal family torn apart by unimaginable allegations is a wholly remarkable effort from Andrew Jarecki, who went on to do HBO’s “The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst.”

The Byrnes in "Meet the Parents"

It’s really time to retire the overprotective-father-of-the-bride routine, but it was sent up to hilarious affect here. Lie detectors should not be parenting tools.

The Jordans in "Happiness"

Pretty much every movie from director Todd Solondz is about dysfunction, but the Jordan sisters each had their own brand of misery in “Happiness.” That’s not even counting the dysfunction they surround themselves with.

The McDonnoughs in "Raising Arizona"

There’s no lack of love in this family, but a prison guard, a lifelong petty criminal and a stolen baby isn’t exactly “functional.”

The Skywalkers in "Star Wars"

Betrayal, lies and a brother-sister kiss (that’s still weird). And we don’t even know what will befall this clan in “The Force Awakens” yet.