On "Feel the Lightning," the opening shot on Dan Deacon's latest long-player, Gliss Riffer, a robotic voice, likely Deacon himself, intones, "You feel it changing … about to breakthrough." The mechanized man could easily be describing the Baltimore resident's ever-evolving catalog, which has progressed from Technicolor explosions of cartoonish dance music (Spiderman of the Rings, from 2007) to more carefully composed, musically minimalist cross-country treks (America, from 2012).

On "Feel the Lightning," the opening shot on Dan Deacon's latest long-player, Gliss Riffer, a robotic voice, likely Deacon himself, intones, "You feel it changing … about to breakthrough." The mechanized man could easily be describing the Baltimore resident's ever-evolving catalog, which has progressed from Technicolor explosions of cartoonish dance music (Spiderman of the Rings, from 2007) to more carefully composed, musically minimalist cross-country treks (America, from 2012).

Deacon's chameleonic ways continue on Gliss Riffer, arguably his most traditional album to date (the musician's voice is set prominently in the foreground, and a bulk of the songs embrace classic pop structure). Regardless, Deacon doesn't hesitate to let it all hang out from time to time. Witness "Learning to Relax," a frenzied, keyboard-driven number that comes on like the complete antithesis of its title.

The Van Allen Belt opens the show.

Rumba Cafe

9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 20

2507 Summit St., North Campus

columbusrumbacafe.com