Modern Baseball cofounder Jake Ewald described recording sessions for The Perfect Cast EP as "focused" and "confident," labels that stand at odds with the countless questions and uncertainties that arise throughout the mini-album.

Modern Baseball cofounder Jake Ewald described recording sessions for The Perfect Cast EP as "focused" and "confident," labels that stand at odds with the countless questions and uncertainties that arise throughout the mini-album.

"Hey man, whatcha thinking about?" sings Brendan Lukens (Ewald and Lukens share vocal and guitar duties) on the EP-opening "The Waterboy Returns," following up with a string of inquiries: "Are you OK? Do you have anything to say?"

"It was weird, because even though we were really certain on the recording process and how we want to work as a band, this was also the beginning of kind of a realization period for us that [music] is something we might be doing for a long time," said Ewald, 22, who joins Lukens, bassist Ian Farmer and drummer Sean Huber for a concert at Skully's Music-Diner on Tuesday, Dec. 1. "So even though we've become more settled in the studio, we're still coming to terms with the things that are happening with us in our everyday lives."

These developments include graduating college - Perfect Cast sessions were the first that went uninterrupted by coursework - and adjusting to a spotlight that has grown more intense with each year since the Philadelphia crew first launched as an acoustic duo in 2011. The band's previous full-length, You're Gonna Miss It All, from 2014, cracked the Billboard charts, reaching number 97, and in recent months the members have watched as friends and contemporaries have started playing to larger and larger crowds, growing expectations for the spring 2016 release of its next long-player, Holy Ghost.

"At this point you see Knuckle Puck and Foxing and these guys putting out great records and getting on NPR and all this cool stuff," Ewald said. "It makes it more exciting to see the possibilities for your band. It's like 'Oh, last year we went on tour with these guys. What's going to happen when we put out our album?'"

Though Modern Baseball is now speaking to a larger audience, and at increased volume - rollicking pop-punk guitar outbursts have long since replaced those early acoustic forays - its songs have managed to maintain the journal intimacy that defined those initial efforts.

"Growing up, we were drawn to music that was really self-analytical and introspective, where the lyrics were so vulnerable you kind of create this trusting relationship with the band's catalog," Ewald said. "For me, that's still one of the most important things, for sure. When you're alone listening to a song somebody wrote X years ago, and they're 3,000 miles across the world, but it's on your record player. In that moment you're connecting with what that person created, and there's not a feeling like that anywhere else. I want to write those kinds of songs."