"What kind of sound could fill this silence?" George Barrie sang in the midst of a Friday Brothers Drake concert headlined by his namesake band. It didn't take long for the trio of players backing the singer/guitarist to craft a response, locking into a blues-rock swing awash in jazzy keyboard fills, rubbery bass and steady, rhythmic drumming.

"What kind of sound could fill this silence?" George Barrie sang in the midst of a Friday Brothers Drake concert headlined by his namesake band. It didn't take long for the trio of players backing the singer/guitarist to craft a response, locking into a blues-rock swing awash in jazzy keyboard fills, rubbery bass and steady, rhythmic drumming.

Barrie, a longtime member of soul/funk crew MojoFlo, stepped out on his own for this EP release show (a full-length is currently in process and should see daylight sometime next year), though the quartet's songs tended to avoid solitude, instead tracing the romantic battles between would-be and former lovers. Over the course of the evening, the frontman challenged a paramour to do their worst ("Cause your worst is still better than all the rest"), described a relationship as a trial-worthy offense ("This love's a crime of the first degree") and soaked up the words "I love you" like so much wine on the faith-restoring "I Believe."

Though relationships tended to introduce a degree of turbulence - "It's easy being lonely," Barrie offered in contrast on one tune - there was never any questioning their essential nature. Witness one song where the narrator stumbled and lost his footing, only to catch himself on his partner. "Help me get back home," Barrie sang.

The music similarly hinged on the chemistry between the four players - the band, which usually performs as a trio, added a keyboardist for additional muscle and texture here - which exhibited itself in a series of extended jams that ranged from essential (the soaring blues-guitar outro tagged onto "I'm Not Alone") to gratuitous (a cover song sampler platter that merged passages lifted from AC/DC's "Back in Black" and Black Sabbath's "Iron Man," among other classics).

As a guitarist, Barrie proved equally adept bending out glass-smooth solos and layering on sketched-out riffs as shaggy as his slightly unkempt 'do. Regardless, the band tended to favor a more polished, genial approach, and even in those moments Barrie's words expressed knottier sentiments ("Got a list of wrongs I need to correct") there remained a lingering sense things would find a way to work themselves out in the end.