With Modern Baseball set to headline a concert at Skully's Music-Diner on Tuesday, Dec. 1, we thought we'd take a look at some of the best songs about America's pastime. Here, in chronological order, are a dozen cuts to keep listeners dreaming of spring training through winter's endless chill.

With Modern Baseball set to headline a concert at Skully's Music-Diner on Tuesday, Dec. 1, we thought we'd take a look at some of the best songs about America's pastime. Here, in chronological order, are a dozen cuts to keep listeners dreaming of spring training through winter's endless chill.

The Treniers: "Say Hey (The Willie Mays Song)" (1955)

The bluesy number has a swing nearly as natural as that of Mays himself.

Key lyric: "He runs the bases like a choo-choo train/ Swings around second like an aeroplane."

Chance Halladay: "Home Run" (1961)

Go ahead and tell the nieces and nephews Halladay is singing about baseball on this rockabilly number, even though you probably know otherwise.

Key lyric: "Strike one/ Ball two/ I want to get to first base with you."

Albert Jones: "Vida Blue" (1971)

The six-time All Star isn't as celebrated as some of his contemporaries, but he managed to inspire what might be the funkiest tune ever composed about a ballplayer.

Key lyric: "Killebrew, Yastrzemski, and Gates Brown, too/ They can't buy a hit off of Vida Blue."

Warren Zevon: "Bill Lee" (1980)

Zevon's ode to Lee, nicknamed "Spaceman," focuses as much on his outspoken rep ("Sometimes I say what I shouldn't") as his on-field successes.

Key lyric: "When I'm standing in the middle of the diamond all alone/ I always play to win."

John Fogerty: "Centerfield" (1985)

Fogerty's gently rocking anthem is still the go-to baseball song for every stadium DJ.

Key lyric: "Put me in coach/ I'm ready to play."

Bob Dylan: "Catfish" (1991)

Originally recorded for Dylan's 1976 album Desire, the musician's tribute to Hall of Fame pitcher Jim "Catfish" Hunter didn't surface until it found release on a 1991 compilation.

Key lyric: "Reggie Jackson at the plate/ Seein' nothin' but the curve/ Swing too early or too late/ Got to eat what Catfish serve."

Jean Grae (featuring Natural Resource): "Negro Baseball League" (1996)

The MC's scathing, race-based critiques make for essential listening.

Key lyric: "How come when black men hit the field, they were throwin' bottles/ Now they throwin' million dollar deals?"

Billy Bragg & Wilco: "Joe DiMaggio's Done It Again" (2000)

The song, which appeared on Mermaid Avenue Vol. II, might've been penned by Woody Guthrie, but Wilco and Billy Bragg combine to breathe folk hero life into the man at the center of this banjo-fueled tune.

Key lyric: "Clackin' that bat, gone with the wind/ Joe DiMaggio's done it again."

Belle & Sebastian: "Piazza, New York Catcher" (2003)

The most unlikely band to ever write about sports centers its song on one of baseball's more bizarre occurrences: the 2002 press conference Mike Piazza called to denounce rumors he was gay.

Key lyric: "San Francisco's calling us, the Giants and Mets will play/ Piazza, New York catcher, are you straight or are you gay?"

Ry Cooder: "3rd Base, Dodger Stadium" (2005)

The song focuses on the lower income community that exists in the stadium's shadow, like a musical version of the 2007 film "Chop Shop."

Key lyric: "I work here nights, parking cars/ Underneath the moon and stars."

Kanye West: "Barry Bonds" (2007)

This one is more about West's hit-making potential than baseball, but it still builds on a beat as muscled-up as late-career Bonds.

Key lyric: "And here's another hit, Barry Bonds."

The Baseball Project: "Don't Call Them Twinkies" (2011)

We could pick any number of songs by this all-star crew, but we'll stick with this playful paean penned by guest contributor Craig Finn, which comes on like a lost Hold Steady nugget.

Key lyric: "In the fall of '87 I was pretty much in heaven/ I got my license and a girlfriend, and the Twins had won the pennant."

Lorde: "Royals" (2013)

Admittedly, "Royals" has nothing to do with baseball, but Lorde said in an interview the tune was first inspired by a picture of a Royals player (later determined to be George Brett) that appeared in National Geographic.

Key lyric: "And we'll never be royals/ It don't run in our blood."'