With Tin Armor gearing up for its 10th anniversary concert, bandmates and brothers Matt and John Umland arrived in a contemplative mood for a late December interview at a Bexley coffee shop.

With Tin Armor gearing up for its 10th anniversary concert, bandmates and brothers Matt and John Umland arrived in a contemplative mood for a late December interview at a Bexley coffee shop.

"Listening to the songs [in preparation for the show] has caused me to reflect on the amount I've grown and changed in the last 10 years," said Matt Umland, 31, who will join his brother John, along with fellow bandmates Matt O'Conke and Matty Golightly, for a Carabar concert on Friday, Jan. 8. "When I was younger I saw steadfastness as a virtue, and … so much of the music I wrote 10 years ago was in service of never changing and always being the way that I am, man! Now the things I search for to find contentment in life are different. I don't feel different than I did then, but I know I am different, and listening to those old songs makes me appreciate that even more."

Dynamics within the band have gradually shifted as well. In recent years, the songwriting process has become increasingly collaborative - "It used to be more fragmented, where Matt would bring in a song and we would write up towards it and it would sort of forever feel like Matt's song; I would say all the songs now feel like ours," John said - even as changing priorities altered the musicians' collective focus.

"The band feels more precious, because [the time we spend on] it is more infrequent, no doubt," Matt said. "I think there were times, especially when we were really pushing hard, where it felt like a job. It doesn't feel like that anymore."

The brothers traced the shift two years back, to the period following the release of Tin Armor's 2013 self-titled album, when the band members paused to take stock of things and reassess what they hoped to achieve with music.

"We got together and had a conversation: 'Do we still want to do this?'" John said. "At that moment, [the band] wasn't a top priority. We were all putting more energy into different parts of our lives. It was scary for sure, but ultimately reaffirming, because we all kind of agreed we love doing this and love playing this music. Then we started writing a new record."

Though written and recorded at a leisurely pace, the brothers alternately described the new material, which should surface in some form in 2016, as "aggressive," "faster" and "edgy."

"Writing this album together was cathartic," John said. "It was a way for us to funnel all these feelings of instability and lack of sure footing and put it into something we could control."

And while relationships, families and careers might have altered some of Tin Armor's goals for the band, the musicians still hope to generate some heat with the new album.

"I don't feel the need to set the world on fire anymore, [but] I wouldn't mind the occasional spark," Matt said, laughing. "Everyone likes that, right?"