Both Eternal Summers' name and its press photo (dig those tropical, multicolored flowers) offer some welcome respite from these frigid January days. The same could be said of Gold and Stone, the fourth album the indie-rock trio has released in five years, which builds largely around casual, gauzy guitars and singer Nicole Yun's perpetually sunbathed vocals.

Both Eternal Summers' name and its press photo (dig those tropical, multicolored flowers) offer some welcome respite from these frigid January days. The same could be said of Gold and Stone, the fourth album the indie-rock trio has released in five years, which builds largely around casual, gauzy guitars and singer Nicole Yun's perpetually sunbathed vocals.

It's a warming power the band hints at on the meandering "Ebb Tide," where drummer and occasional vocalist Daniel Cundiff takes the lead. "If you find yourself alone and cold/ Hold onto the notes that make you whole," he sings.

The Virginia-based crew displayed its beach bod more prominently on early albums like Silver, which came on like an extended spring break, the bandmates bounding through chipper songs like "Pogo" and "Running High" as though the sun might never dip behind the clouds. Gold and Stone, in contrast, finds the musicians exploring welcome counterpoints to this sound. "Unassigned," for one, layers together gentle, shimmering guitars that gradually degrade as the song reaches its climax, serenity giving way to an unsettling industrial buzz. "Play Dead," in turn, tosses and turns - a rare restless night in the band's dream-inducing catalog.

Lazyeyes also performs.