Daymare's debut EP might open with "Hope," but singer/guitarist Dustin Rinehart sounds as though he's caught in a downward spiral throughout, filling the band's shattered songs with mentions of bleeding out, leaving everything behind and standing by as the flames slowly burn out, leaving behind little more than a charred, barren landscape.

Daymare's debut EP might open with "Hope," but singer/guitarist Dustin Rinehart sounds as though he's caught in a downward spiral throughout, filling the band's shattered songs with mentions of bleeding out, leaving everything behind and standing by as the flames slowly burn out, leaving behind little more than a charred, barren landscape.

"I give you every drop of my blood," Rinehart howls on one song, coming on like a man desperate to pump new life into the broken corpse of a relationship.

While the frontman's words frequently explore unsteady ground, delving into insecurity, anxiety and heartache, the band's music typically sounds concrete-reinforced, built on thundering drums, low, rumbling bass, and tiger-claw guitar riffage - a contrast that has interested Daymare since Rinehart and drummer Austin Spears first launched the band as a duo in October 2013 (guitarist Eric Lozier and bassist Kyle Hull round out the current lineup).

"In a way, I felt like I was purging a lot of things, and I was really apprehensive to have those emotions on display for everyone to see and hear," said Rinehart, 33, who joins his bandmates for a record release show at Spacebar on Friday, Jan. 15. "Like a lot of artists, there was a relationship that ended … and I just decided to stop being afraid to write and to sing and to put myself out there in front of people. I wasn't sure if I was up to the challenge at first, but now that I've been doing it more, I realize it's the perfect fit."

From the onset, Rinehart and Spears had a clear understanding of the kind of music they hoped to craft in Daymare - "We knew we wanted a heavier rock sound with more of a pop-song structure," Rinehart said - but rather than rushing headlong into performing and recording, the two held back, spending nearly 18 months refining their sound and approach before booking their first show.

"There are a lot of bands that get in a room for a couple weeks or a month or whatever it is, churn out a bunch of songs and then it's like, 'Alright, let's start booking shows.' No. Let's think about this. Let's write and let that be the focus," said Rinehart, who was born in Chillicothe and raised by a homemaker mother and a father employed by the paper mill. "We wanted to take as much time as we needed. It was like, 'Let's not rush this. It'll be ready when it's ready.'"

Prior to launching Daymare, Rinehart played bass in a handful of punk bands, though he was continually searching for an outlet diverse enough to contain his sprawling musical interests.

"I love Pantera and Slayer, but I also love Jeff Buckley and Prince, and it was like, 'How can I put all these things in a blender and do something with it?'" he said. "It took years of trial and error … but in the end I feel like we have a nice mix of all of those things in Daymare songs. And there are still plenty of places for us to go."