English singer and songwriter Dan Melchior is surely a lovely person, but over the course of a nearly 20-year career the prolific musician has repeatedly gravitated towards uglier sounds, constructing scrapheap albums filled with junkyard blues, wobbly garage rock and clattering punk noise. It's a corroded side he confronts on "Dirty Lies," the opening cut off his 2013 solo record K-85. "I've got a morgue inside me," he sings. "It's full of rotting dead."

English singer and songwriter Dan Melchior is surely a lovely person, but over the course of a nearly 20-year career the prolific musician has repeatedly gravitated towards uglier sounds, constructing scrapheap albums filled with junkyard blues, wobbly garage rock and clattering punk noise. It's a corroded side he confronts on "Dirty Lies," the opening cut off his 2013 solo record K-85. "I've got a morgue inside me," he sings. "It's full of rotting dead."

Fittingly, some of Melchior's best work sounds freshly exhumed, arriving caked in layers of mud, grime and gristle. Such is the case on Lords of the Manor, the 2015 album the musician recorded alongside his off-and-on band, Dan Melchior's Broke Revue. "I Don't Know," for one, kicks off with a guitar riff that mirrors a primal drawing scratched into a cave wall, while "Jaki" builds around a thick, ominous bassline and howling guitars that generate a sub-zero wind chill.

Throughout, Melchior pairs these clattering backdrops with words that alternate between insightful, insidious and uproarious. Dig "Outskirts," where he repeatedly sneers that "only Glenn Beck's tears can wash us clean." The musician performs solo here, but even in comparatively skeletal form his songs should shake any loose debris from the rafters.

Long Odds, Tommy Jay and Paul & Ginny open the show.