If you are a loyal reader of my movie reviews (Hi, Mom! Love you.), you already know how I feel about "Anomalisa." I watched a screener of it the night before finalizing my list of the top movies of 2015. It came in at #2, right in between the two movies I had wrestled with at #1 for weeks ("Ex Machina" and "Room").

If you are a loyal reader of my movie reviews (Hi, Mom! Love you.), you already know how I feel about "Anomalisa." I watched a screener of it the night before finalizing my list of the top movies of 2015. It came in at #2, right in between the two movies I had wrestled with at #1 for weeks ("Ex Machina" and "Room").

A few weeks have passed, and another viewing hasn't changed my feelings. It's weird and brilliant and heartbreaking and unlike anything you've ever seen.

This isn't unexpected, as "Anomalisa" is the latest from the mind of Charlie Kaufman, the writer behind "Being John Malkovich," "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" and "Adaptation." Kaufman wrote and co-directed the stop-motion animation "Anomalisa" with Duke Johnson, and it fits right in with the themes of the Kaufman universe.

Michael Stone (voiced by David Thewlis) is the author of a popular book on customer service entitled "How May I Help You Help Them?" As he flies in to Cincinnati for a speaking engagement, we get a taste of the mundanity of his life. From room service to the mini-bar to all the people around him, everything in Michael's life runs together.

That is, until he meets Lisa (Jennifer Jason Leigh), a shy phone sales rep who has traveled all the way from Akron to hear Michael speak. Their unexpected connection shakes up Michael's world.

"Anomalisa" was based on a play that Kaufman originally wrote for the stage, intended to be read aloud by actors much like a radio play. Producer Dino Stamatopoulos convinced Kaufman to take it the screen. They did so with a startling stop-motion style evocative of Stamatopoulos' short-lived Adult Swim series "Moral Orel" - which itself was a take on the '60s claymation series "Davey and Goliath."

Don't let this background fool you. Kaufman and Johnson make "Anomalisa" both gorgeous and meticulous. Set almost entirely in a Cincinnati hotel, it's framed with a meticulous symmetry that Stanley Kubrick would approve of, and the emotion wrung from these puppets is impressive.

This being Kaufman, there is an overarching technique to the narrative that highlights Michael's desperate loneliness - and if you don't already know it, it's best to let it unfold. I'll say that the voice work is amazing, from Thewlis' weary emotional flatness to Jason Leigh's swimming self-doubt. Tom Noonan should have received a Best Supporting Actor nod for his crucial voice role.

It's not Kaufman's first foray into exploring the dance between loneliness and connection. "Anomalisa" is the kind of experience that will stick with you.