With Guinea Worms, Will Foster tended to explore the uglier sides of humanity ("Waste of time and space … the human race!" he howled on one song during a late 2013 appearance at Ace of Cups), pairing these apocalyptic visions with a clattering musical backdrop steeped in noise and decaying post-punk.

With Guinea Worms, Will Foster tended to explore the uglier sides of humanity ("Waste of time and space … the human race!" he howled on one song during a late 2013 appearance at Ace of Cups), pairing these apocalyptic visions with a clattering musical backdrop steeped in noise and decaying post-punk.

For his new solo cassette, The Cuss Set (Superdreamer Records), Foster has dialed back the volume some, though crusty, roots-rock inspired turns like "Black Box Blues" still sound eternally unshaven, built on shaggy dog guitars, drums that perpetually sound on the verge of collapse and reverb-laden vocals that could've been recorded on malfunctioning equipment. A label email accompanying news of the tape described the release as "a longer haired take on punk rock and a more deaf version of folk," and, judging by a small sampling, Foster deftly walks the line between the chaotic sound of his earlier years and the shaggy troubadour he could one day become.

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Will Foster

Credit Will Foster