The fine arts scene in Columbus is enriched by the presence of artist training and development programs at CCAD and Ohio State University, among others. "Joint Crux," opening Jan. 29 at MINT, seeks to showcase talent from both schools - an approach curator and MINT Collective member Grace E. Bowen feels is all too infrequent.

The fine arts scene in Columbus is enriched by the presence of artist training and development programs at CCAD and Ohio State University, among others.

"Joint Crux," opening Jan. 29 at MINT, seeks to showcase talent from both schools - an approach curator and MINT Collective member Grace E. Bowen feels is all too infrequent.

"You don't often see much communication between the two [institutions]," Bowen said. "I want to show undergraduate work from both to foster future collaborations between students and faculty."

Bowen said the nature of the two institutions - one an art school and one a program within a major research university - creates natural differences in approach. She hopes MINT, a collective of artists from diverse backgrounds as well as a new space, can foster more of a crossover, showing work representing both approaches side-by-side.

For "Joint Crux," Bowen selected work from current bachelor of fine arts undergrads and recent graduates, including: Ki Rodriguez, Liz Martin and Tanner Burns, all 2015 OSU BFA graduates; and CCAD BFA seniors Franklin Cain-Borgers, Vlad Petrovski, Ashley Smithkey and Michael Geiger.

"I think it is really wonderful that Grace has decided to open curate a show like this. I think there has been this unnecessary segregation of the two schools," Borgers said. "I think that we need to break down this pseudo-boundary and make a connection between the two schools, because no matter how corny it may sound, community is everything; and I think Grace's show is definitely pushing for that to become more of the norm."

"I've never been involved with any students from CCAD, so this is new territory for me," Rodriguez said. "I've seen some of the work coming out of that school and I have been impressed with the quality of some of the pieces I've come across. The studio art BFAs at OSU were (and still are) all pretty tight knit. We've been able to inform each other's work and have much needed sub-surface-level critiques and honest criticisms with one another so hopefully this can carry over to a conversation with the CCAD crowd. I'm excited that contemporaries from these two worlds can come together to have an open a dialogue."

"It's exciting getting the opportunity to work with both schools together, because I've never personally met any artists from OSU," Smithkey said. "I admittedly don't know very much about their art program so it will be a new experience. At CCAD, we have a strong design and graphics community, so it will be interesting to get insight on OSU's art program."

A broad curatorial brush was required, Bowen said, in the interest of providing as full a survey of work as possible.

"I didn't want to possibly leave out pieces just because they didn't fit a theme," Bowen said. "I wanted to see how the work could communicate while still providing a survey of the skills and ideas involved from both schools."

"Joint Crux" will feature two- and three-dimensional work, as well as sound and video pieces.

"The installation, 'Others,' that will be featured in 'Joint Crux' is a work that I made for my BFA thesis while still studying at [OSU]. 'Others'addresses the concept of how my identity is formed from two selves, and confronts the fact that the version of self that is projected into the world does not often match the internal self," Martin said. "The installation is a product of my interdisciplinary studio practice. Though my emphasis was ceramics in my undergraduate studies, this piece combines ceramic, paper and fibrous materials in forms that were both cast from molds and constructed by hand."

"I have been dealing, in general, with themes of the home, specifically the suburban.In regards to this environment, I have been working with the notions of the surreality of these 'luxury' home developments and the artificiality of that 'ideal' lifestyle," Cain-Borgers said of his work planned for "Joint Crux." "This has been my overarching mindset and has influenced both my sculptural work as well as my painting."

"I'm excited to be presenting my work at MINT," Rodriguez said. "The piece sounds and feels different in every new space it's in, so I'm excited to see what the ultimate 'conversation' it has with the surroundings will be. There's always a flow in a show, and I'm interested to see how my work fits into 'Joint Crux.'"

"My works in the exhibition are glass illustrations, made by drawing on blown glass vessels with soft pastels," Smithkey said. "These illustrations have metal wire, thread, leather cord and even cotton balls."

"The space at MINT is so large, it's a great space to show these works, to allow them to have some space around them for people to consider each work on its own and then move on to the next," Bowen said.

Friday's opening reception for "Joint Crux" will include an artist talk at 9 p.m. The exhibition will be open through Feb. 19 by appointment.