"Nothing stays the same," the members of Yo La Tengo sing on "Ohm," a line that doubles as universal truth for the long-running indie-rock crew, which has embraced evolution as one of the keys to its existence.

"Nothing stays the same," the members of Yo La Tengo sing on "Ohm," a line that doubles as universal truth for the long-running indie-rock crew, which has embraced evolution as one of the keys to its existence.

The band's concerts can be unpredictable affairs - often by design (see the "Spinning Wheel" tour, in which an audience member decided the fate of a show by spinning a giant onstage wheel) - and even its best-known songs are constantly morphing and taking on new, unexpected shapes. On Stuff Like That There, from 2015, Yo La Tengo interspersed new tracks and cover songs alongside reimagined takes culled from the band's own catalog. Included are a power-washed version of "Deeper Into Movies" and an airier, somehow more delicate take on "All Your Secrets," which comes on less like an invitation to unburden oneself than an assurance those words will remain safely guarded.

Last fall, former member Dave Schramm joined the band on guitar to help it celebrate the 25th anniversary of Fakebook, an album that paired five originals with 11 covers culled from the group's deep record collection (The Flamin' Groovies, Rex Garvin & the Mighty Cravers and so on). For this current run, however, Yo La Tengo is reverting to a trio, featuring long-standing members Ira Kaplan, Georgia Hubley and James McNew. Whatever form the group will take next, however, is anybody's guess.