Early in the rescue mission at the core of "The Finest Hours," a Coast Guard crew navigating a deadly New England nor'easter loses its compass, but it doesn't matter. We all know where this ship is going.

Early in the rescue mission at the core of "The Finest Hours," a Coast Guard crew navigating a deadly New England nor'easter loses its compass, but it doesn't matter. We all know where this ship is going.

The Disney "based on a true story" course is tried and true, and the end result is a movie that never manages much excitement or tension, despite trying so earnestly you almost root for it.

It's 1951, and Bernie Webber (Chris Pine) is an impossibly "aw shucks" young New Englander who serves dutifully in the Coast Guard. He meets Miriam (Holliday Grainger) in a first date straight out of the collective memories of baby boomers, and they fall in love.

Meanwhile, out on the Atlantic, the members of an oil tanker crew fight for their lives using some good ol' fashioned American ingenuity after a storm rips their ship in two. Their only hope is a four-man crew led by Bernie to navigate treacherous waters and find a needle in a haystack.

"The Finest Hours" basks in that warm nostalgia and its tale of a pure and simplistic heroism. It's a Dad movie if ever there was one.

But even with that added love story, it doesn't do much to actually hook an audience. It parallels Bernie's story with another unlikely hero in a tanker-worker-turned-captain played by Casey Affleck - an obvious casting addition when you're laying down New England accents thicker than chowdah.

The whole thing is fueled by standard hero speeches and CGI-aided peril. It's OK that "The Finest Hours" strains plausibility, but it's the kind of movie you forget about as soon as you're done watching it, even with the unnecessary 3D treatment.