Satele describes his artistic evolution as a continuous process of embracing those things that make him unique, beginning with his birth name: Toese Satele Brewer.

Satele describes his artistic evolution as a continuous process of embracing those things that make him unique, beginning with his birth name: Toese Satele Brewer.

"As I've gotten older, I see how valuable it is to stand out and be different - even with my name, because no one else has it," said the beat-maker, who performs at Skully's Music-Diner on Wednesday, Feb. 10. "My parents brought me up to always try to be different. If it wasn't for my parents instilling that in me - to continue to live up to my name and to be unique - I don't think I would be where I am now."

Growing up, however, Satele wanted nothing more than to fit in, though it often proved a struggle both in school - "I didn't have many friends, and I didn't know anybody who was into the same things I was into," he said - and at home, where his artistic side occasionally clashed with his more athletically minded siblings.

"I couldn't naturally conform," said Satele, 23, who was born in Anchorage, Alaska, and moved to Columbus with his family at four years old. "Once I found music, I really embraced it because it was the only outlet I had that was different from my siblings or the rest of my friends. When I started making music I was like, 'You know what? This is something that's me. I need to embrace all of me and then I'll be cool.'"

Even as a teenager, Satele gravitated toward producers rather than singers or rappers, noting the early influence of beat-makers like the Neptunes and Timbaland, a natural fondness heightened by a subtle nudge from the musician's painfully honest mother.

"I remember asking my mom, 'Could I be a singer?' And she was like, 'No.' OK, mom! Thank you!" said a laughing Satele, who has now released a trio of instrumental albums, produced songs for Dominique Larue ("Ultimate") and teamed with rapper Ceezar in hip-hop duo theFWD. "But I was always interested in how music was created. Who made this beat for this artist? How did they come up with this? I wanted to be able to mold a track into something beautiful."

Additionally, music allowed Satele a chance to flaunt the wide range of emotions that swirled beneath his perennially composed exterior.

"I'm not an emotional person," said Satele. "It sounds cliché, but music is the only way I can express those feelings. Writers write and painters paint. [Music] is my way to express myself."