Artist and illustrator Valerie Starr had markers - more than 100 of them - and she rarely went anywhere without them.

Artist and illustrator Valerie Starr had markers - more than 100 of them - and she rarely went anywhere without them.

Having dabbled in painting and drawing, Starr found a voice in markers and comics, said Talcott Starr, the late artist's husband.

"She needed an unlimited palette," he said.

Wild Goose Creative will host "The Curiosity of Valerie Starr" in February. The exhibition is a retrospective touching on all three main projects on which Starr had worked prior to her summer 2015 death from cancer.

"Valerie and I had been working to plan this show, based on an ambitious new project she had begun just before she passed away," Wild Goose Head Curator Jessie Boettcher said. "She had been examining the connections between cultures via the common threads of the folk stories associated with them, as well as folk narratives of invented cultures she had created."

"She had been making up her own mythologies, this elaborate idea based around folk literature and common threads among real-world myths," Talcott said.

"Folk" will be among the series examined in the retrospective, along with a collection of landscapes and Valerie's signature work, "Octopus Story."

"It was her first comic," Talcott said. "It was the story of a curious octopus who comes out of the sea and encounters new experiences and new friends.

"It opened up a lot of her creativity, discovering how much she liked to work with markers."

Talcott said the landscape series was a way for Valerie to explore the potential of markers and the techniques involved with them. From there, she expanded her vision to the "Folk" project.

"She was always interested in trying to understand the world in as many ways as possible. She also had this childlike wonder and enthusiasm," he said.

Talcott was heavily involved in the assembly and presentation of the exhibition at Wild Goose, which will feature all of the "Octopus Story" work together for the first time.

"[This exhibition] was all she talked about," he said. "Seeing her artistic legacy all in one place and knowing how excited she would be for people to see it and share it… It's an incredible cliché but it feels like putting her up on the wall in a very odd and good way."