Confession time: I'm tired of superhero movies. Even (mostly) the good ones. There are 15 Marvel movies slated for release between now and the end of 2020 - I, for one, can't even handle the anticipation for "Untitled Marvel Movie 3!" - along with another 16 from the DC Comics catalog.

Confession time: I'm tired of superhero movies. Even (mostly) the good ones.

There are 15 Marvel movies slated for release between now and the end of 2020 - I, for one, can't even handle the anticipation for "Untitled Marvel Movie 3!" - along with another 16 from the DC Comics catalog.

Some of these, statistically speaking, will be great, but I'm feeling more than a little burnt out on the genre. And that's exactly why I friggin' loved "Deadpool."

No, it's not the subversive reimagining of the genre some were hoping for. It is, at its core, just another superhero origin movie, but goddamn if it doesn't have a lot of fun with that.

And that origin story is pretty fun to watch unfold, so why spoil it here? Just know that Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) is not your typical Marvel hero. Nor is this your typical Marvel movie.

The tone is set with the opening credits. Again, I won't spoil, but know that they're brilliant and sort of perfect. The tone is irreverent. The content is nowhere near PG-13, and I for one am thankful for that (and hope it doesn't cost "Deadpool" at the box office, or we might not see any more comic-book movies that cater to adults).

"Adults," not "grown-ups," mind you, because "Deadpool" is high-minded but decidedly low-brow, featuring graphic violence, (relatively) graphic sex and graphic language. If your Marvel-loving kid wants to go to this, parents, give pause. You'll have some 'splaining to do.

But that's part of what make "Deadpool" so much fun. It subverts all the PG-13 punch-pulling of the blockbusters, all while making fun of the studio factory that's making lots of bucks on the Marvel Universe.

Also, can I say this? Ryan Reynolds is underrated as hell. He was fantastic in one of my Top 10 movies of last year (the criminally underseen "The Voices," which is now on Amazon Prime). A recent discussion outside St. James Tavern revealed that I am, in fact, not the only remaining fan of "Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place" (the sitcom that launched his career), and "Deadpool" proves that he's more than willing to make fun of himself and his last turn in tights, the truly terrible adaptation of "Green Lantern."

"Deadpool" boasts some great stylish action, and is probably the funniest movie of the young year. Whether you're a die-hard fanboy or, like me, a person who thinks the superhero movie machine needed a kick in the crotch, I recommend you go see this. Maybe the genre's not dead yet.

P.S.: Stick around for the obligatory post-credit scene. This one is worth it.