Easy Street Cafe in Bexley, like its eponymic sibling in German Village (open since 1983), is one of those reliable diners offering an all-day menu that speaks with a Greek accent. Although only open for a few months, the new Easy Street has the look and feel of a perennial neighborhood favorite.

Easy Street Cafe in Bexley, like its eponymic sibling in German Village (open since 1983), is one of those reliable diners offering an all-day menu that speaks with a Greek accent. Although only open for a few months, the new Easy Street has the look and feel of a perennial neighborhood favorite.

The convivial place occupies a long and narrow space with simple wooden tables, relaxed lighting and a popular bar that runs nearly the length of its small room. Expect down-to-earth charm, personable (but not always speedy) service and 10 draft beers, several brewed locally.

If you show up for Easy Street's well-attended breakfast, the place shakes a strong and spicy Bloody Mary ($9) that makes a fine match with The Hash ($8), a semi-sweet melange of hacked and crisply griddled corned beef, potatoes, onions and green peppers served with two eggs.

If you enjoy a rich snack and special effects, I have two words of advice: flaming cheese. On the menu, it's Saganaki ($9.50), a Greek classic involving a tableside flambe of kasseri cheese ignited with 151-proof rum and extinguished by squeezed lemons. Easy Street's impressive little fire created a deep, golden crust on an irresistible block of molten cheese. Scooped up with grilled pita, it's a hot mess to eat, but a menu standout.

The other real standout I sampled is the Lamb Lollipops ($11) appetizer - petite rib chops with "frenched" bones and seared, melt-in-your-mouth meat sporting a minty herb rub. The steak-like trio is served with thick and garlicky tzatziki, toasted pita wedges, Kalamata olives, red onion, feta cheese and pepperoncini.

Those accompaniments, which appear often here, also grace the Falafel Plate ($14). The falafel is pretty good - irregular, aromatic orbs with crispy shells - but the $8 Falafel Gyro is a better value. Prefer a Chicken Gyro ($8)? It's made with flavorful seared white meat, and is also pretty good but not memorable.

"Pretty good but not memorable" could describe much of what I tried at Easy Street. For example, it covers the thin and tangy Avgolemono Soup ($3.25), meaty and tomato-y Chili ($3.50) with an immersed, split jalapeno cornbread muffin, and the Greek Salad ($7). The latter adds a zingy vinaigrette, tomatoes, green peppers, lettuce, cucumbers and pepperoncini to Easy Street's go-to lineup - Kalamata olives, red onion and feta cheese ("Betta with feta" is a tagline here).

Homemade pizzas are featured, and because you're on Easy Street, you can get one hybridized with a gyro. The Greek Pizza ($14) tops a crisp, medium-thick and bready crust with pesto sauce, diced and griddled gyro meat, tomatoes, feta, red onion, Kalamata olives and blots of rich tzatziki. It's fun and easy to munch on - and had me wondering where the Greek tacos and Greek egg rolls were.

A couple dishes on separate visits had me wondering why Easy Street sometimes veered onto Greasy Street. On one occasion, The Hash arrived cold and with so much oil I initially thought it might be a sauce. And although an otherwise top-notch Philly Steak sandwich ($12, with good-tasting, hand-cut fries that could've been crisper) had uncommonly tender meat, it also arrived soggy with oil and not warm enough.

For the most part, though, Easy Street is the kind of versatile, convenient and friendly restaurant that would be welcome on anyone's street. If another branch popped up in my neighborhood, I'd gladly add it to my rotation of local haunts.