Brooklyn-based ensemble 600 Highwaymen's "Employee of the Year," a chronicle of the life journey of a woman from age three to 80, builds on the budding troupe's reputation of developing fresh, imaginative approaches in theater.

Brooklyn-based ensemble 600 Highwaymen's "Employee of the Year," a chronicle of the life journey of a woman from age three to 80, builds on the budding troupe's reputation of developing fresh, imaginative approaches in theater.

A cast of five young girls tells a not-for-young-audiences story of aging, transformation and identity.

Co-artistic director Michael Silverstone said the casting of all children provided the appropriate framework for examining the notion of time and aging.

Silverstone described the play as a sequence of five monologues, with each of the young girls playing the main character at different stages in her life.

"The story is about watching somebody put together the pieces of their life, assembling their identity, rather than this exceptional life story," Silverstone said.

The monologues are accompanied by non-literal movement, the primary support to the text in this play that features no set or props.

"The girls are executing simple gestures, sort of moving through space," Silverstone said. "It's really beautiful because the gestures are not strictly literal. The audience sort of puts together the pieces."

"Employee of the Year" includes original songs by Obie Award-winner David Cale.