I kinda knew I needed to go to Rehab, but, until I finally went, I didn't realize what a breezy experience it'd be. That's my requisite silly joke about Rehab Tavern.

I kinda knew I needed to go to Rehab, but, until I finally went, I didn't realize what a breezy experience it'd be. That's my requisite silly joke about Rehab Tavern.

I still mean what I wrote: while drinking in the fashionably irreverent watering hole and indulging in its pop-up restaurant specializing in smoked wings (which I'll get to soon), I realized that I'd underestimated the relaxing times to be had in Rehab Tavern on a Sunday afternoon.

Rehab, which forms a triumvirate of hipness in the Franklinton Arts District with steps-away Strongwater Food & Spirits and Land-Grant Brewing Company, is brimming with local art congruent with Rehab's ambience: low-key, Lower East Side Manhattan saloon. The patio-equipped place, which has been open about three years, deserves its tagline of "a short drive to a clean dive."

It also deserves its name, literally, as it sports a bar fashioned from rehabbed barn wood, floorboards from a 1950s high school basketball court and old artworks amusingly transformed into furniture.

These attributes create an inviting spot to cop a squat and sip beers from a respectable tap selection (Land-Grant is in the house). If visiting on a Sunday, you can tack on a nice and light Bloody Mary ($6) while enjoying the booze-friendly fare of Pops' Hot Wings.

"Pops" (who cooks on Sundays from 12-4 p.m. and from 9 p.m. until late on "hip-hop Wednesdays") is Rick Harris. If the strikingly polite and soft-spoken 61-year-old refugee from the corporate world of diamond-dealing seems like a jazz-loving fish outta water, he won't after 1) you learn that his son, Eric Rollin, is a local musician who books gigs at Rehab and 2) you see how beloved Pops' food is here.

Omelets and sandwiches (both $6) are available on Sundays, but I was on a chicken mission. Mission accomplished. The grilled whole wings ($1 each) are char-spotted and feature an irresistible smoky flavor amplified by a zesty spice rub and enhanced by Pops' barbecue sauce - a light and tangy-sweet condiment with a neat little finishing sting.

Ripping through these and the Chicken Fries ($6) - a stoneriffic riff on poutine with crispy crinkle-cutters topped with grilled breast strips, sautéed onions, melted cheese and Pops' sauce - verified that Rehab can indeed get you right again.