With Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, author and reigning Hollywood sceptic (see his Twitter feed, where he deconstructs the scientific shortcomings of films like "Gravity" and "The Martian"), set to visit town for a talk at Palace Theatre on Tuesday, Feb. 23, we thought we'd take a look at some of our all-time favorite fictional scientists.

With Neil deGrasse Tyson, astrophysicist, author and reigning Hollywood sceptic (see his Twitter feed, where he deconstructs the scientific shortcomings of films like "Gravity" and "The Martian"), set to visit town for a talk at Palace Theatre on Tuesday, Feb. 23, we thought we'd take a look at some of our all-time favorite fictional scientists.

Jane Foster

Natalie Portman portrays the astrophysicist in the "Thor" films, but it seems a little suspicious someone with a strong science background would be so quick to accept alternate worlds populated by gods as a reality.

Tony Stark

Stark - an inventor and playboy who designed a flying metal suit and dubbed himself Iron Man - is the rare superhero whose skillset is almost wholly reliant on natural-born brains rather than brawn or exposure to toxic chemicals.

Beaker

The perpetually terrified looking Muppet assists Dr. Bunsen Honeydew in laboratory experiments that typically result in him being burned, electrocuted or otherwise injured.

Frylock

The "Aqua Teen Hunger Force" inventor - a sentient, goateed box of French fries - is easily the show's brainiest character, which isn't saying much considering he's up against a daft, braggart of a milkshake and a sweet, simple-minded ball of meat.

Walter White

The "Breaking Bad" mainstay begins the series as a mild mannered high school chemistry teacher (***mild spoilers ahead***) and ends it as a drug kingpin with a staggering amount of blood on his hands.

Dana Scully

The truth might be out there, but Scully, who holds a physics degree and logged time in medical school, often functions as the scientific voice of reason on "The X-Files."

Doc Brown

"1.21 Gigawatts!"

Q

Bond's go-to gadget developer made damn sure Bond was always equipped with a pen (which itself came equipped with poison, bullets and/or listening devices). It's the perfect tool for the spy cornered by an assassin or forced into writing a check.

Rick Sanchez

Envision a deeply bitter Doc Brown with a serious drinking problem and you get a pretty nice picture of the mad scientist at the center of the great "Rick & Morty." Bonus points for his acidic tongue and fondness for inane catch phrases. "Yo! What up my glip glops?!"