During a mid-February run of shows with Aye Nako, the members of noise-pop quartet didi passed the time by recording a makeshift version of Song Exploder, a podcast where musicians break a single track down to its most elemental form, dissecting everything from the recording techniques employed to the inspirations behind the lyrics.

During a mid-February run of shows with Aye Nako, the members of noise-pop quartet didi passed the time by recording a makeshift version of Song Exploder, a podcast where musicians break a single track down to its most elemental form, dissecting everything from the recording techniques employed to the inspirations behind the lyrics.

"It was like, 'It's great hearing the Magnetic Fields talk about their song, but what if we learned about each other's songs?'" said guitarist Kevin Bilapka-Arbelaez, who joined fellow singer/songwriters Meg Zakany (guitar) and Leslie Shimizu (bass) for a mid-February interview at an Old North diner (drummer Sheena McGrath completes the band's current lineup, which will be on full display during a Double Happiness concert on Friday, Feb. 26, and again at Ace of Cups on Wednesday, March 2).

"Songwriting ... is really this intimate experience for all of us, where we're really exposing how we feel in this incredibly honest way," Zakany said. "When we talked about the meanings of these songs … it was to the point where we all teared up. It says a lot about how much the music means to us."

The exercise further strengthened the bond between the musicians, which exhibited itself during the band's first rehearsal two-and-a-half years ago and has only deepened with time.

"I've been thinking about when we first started, and how with this band I wanted people I knew would have my back," said Zakany, who served as the catalyst behind didi's formation. "I wanted us to be completely empathetic and compassionate towards each other, and just open about our experiences. And I felt like I could trust you all. You're like best friends."

It's a collective spirit reflected in songs like "Too," a catchy, '90s alt-rock throwback that falls near the onset of the band's self-titled 2015 EP. "Get lost in a person/ Forget about yourself," Zakany and Shimizu sing in tandem atop rubbery bass and deliriously fuzzy guitars before stumbling onto a line that sounds born of didi's well-honed chemistry: "There is nothing greater than what we have when we are in it."

Elsewhere, songs venture into craggier, less steady terrain, touching on heavy emotions like jealousy, loss and shame - a darker, intensely personal direction the band members have started exploring more fully on a new batch of songs they hope to record at Musicol sometime this summer with an eye on an early 2017 full-length release.

"The lyrics typically represent something we're struggling with, or something we have thought about a lot and we want to get out," said Bilapka-Arbelaez, who recently wrote a song called "Anzaldua," which takes its name from Mexican-American author Gloria Anzaldua and wrestles with questions of culture and identity. "I'm playing around with all these ideas, which is something I'd never really felt comfortable doing in music. But now it feels really good and really cathartic."

Zakany, in contrast, approaches songwriting not as a form of release, but as a means of steeping herself more fully in whatever life event she hopes to address.

"When I start to write the words to my songs, I really go into another place. I go to another room. I go to another city. I remember everything around me," she said. "The ideas ruminate, and I sit on them until it becomes heavy. Then I think, 'How do I even put words to this?'"

"The fact everybody writes so differently makes me a better songwriter," Shimizu said.

Despite the differences in approach, the didi mates have never struggled to find common ground, tracing their chemistry back to the band's earliest days.

"At that first practice I nervously tried coming up with something and Meg was immediately like, 'Yes!'" Bilapka-Arbelaez said, laughing. "I realized, 'Oh wow, I can just play something I think sounds good and natural, and it's probably going to sync up with what everyone in the band thinks.' There's a level of trust in this band that I've never experienced before. If someone brings forward an idea for a song, generally we're like, 'Yeah, that's a didi song.' "