Earthless guitarist Isaiah Mitchell considers himself the understanding type, a patience that extends from the band's music - songs regularly clock in at more than 15 minutes in length - to his offstage demeanor, which has suited him well in his part-time role as a guitar instructor.

Earthless guitarist Isaiah Mitchell considers himself the understanding type, a patience that extends from the band's music - songs regularly clock in at more than 15 minutes in length - to his offstage demeanor, which has suited him well in his part-time role as a guitar instructor.

"I 've been teaching music for 16 [or] 17 years, and I teach a lot of beginners and a lot of kids," said Mitchell, who joins bassist Mike Eginton and drummer Mario Rubalcaba for a concert at Ace of Cups on Monday, March 21. "People will always be like, 'I'm so sorry I'm not getting this! You must be going crazy!' And it's like, 'No, just take your time and do it.' I don't get impatient or flustered too often. If someone is just starting off and creating, I've got the patience to help them."

The hard-rock trio exhibits similar patience both onstage and on record, constructing largely instrumental jams that are at once aircraft carrier heavy and clipper ship nimble. Witness the 30-plus minute title track off From the Ages, from 2013, which features dark, oceanic swells of guitar, endurance-testing drums and deep, rumbling bass that somehow keeps the song tethered to terra firma even in those moments Mitchell's solos burn across the skyline with rocket-fuel intensity.

"Mike, he's the backbone. He's the spine," said Mitchell, 36, who first picked up a guitar in 5th grade, thrashing his way through Metallica and Red Hot Chili Peppers covers. "Mario and I can take off to different places and we always know he's there to come back to. He's like the guiding light or the beacon bringing it all back together."

According to Mitchell, this chemistry has been present since the three first started playing together in 2001, though it's now been honed to the point where the trio can employ musical and non-verbal cues to shape and direct extended jams - like long-married folks who can communicate complex thoughts or emotions with a simple gesture or facial expression.

"I'm not thinking of scales or all of the theory when I'm onstage. That's the time to let it go and just play," Mitchell said. "It's about taking the music to a place you haven't gone before, and challenging yourself and challenging each other. When I listen to music like Coltrane or Hendrix or whoever, that's my favorite stuff, where they take off and go somewhere completely new. It's like, 'Where were they going? What were they thinking?' But you can't plan that journey out. You need to be in that moment and let whatever happens happen."