First Day Back is a fitting title for the sophomore effort from Boston-based emo-rock quartet Somos, serving both as an introduction to the crew's freshly revamped sound and a welcome home for the band's singer and bassist Michael Fiorentino, who stepped away from the group for several months in early 2015 to deal with issues stemming from anxiety and depression.

First Day Back is a fitting title for the sophomore effort from Boston-based emo-rock quartet Somos, serving both as an introduction to the crew's freshly revamped sound and a welcome home for the band's singer and bassist Michael Fiorentino, who stepped away from the group for several months in early 2015 to deal with issues stemming from anxiety and depression.

"I thought it was smart long-term to cancel [the February 2015 tour] and regroup. I was really filled with dread at the prospect of going on the road, and anytime you reach that point it makes sense to stop, reassess and go from there," said Fiorentino, who joins his bandmates for a concert at Double Happiness on Sunday, March 20. "It feels like a fresh start in that after stopping touring we were able to move on to a bigger record label and expand a bit musically as a band."

In a statement released at the time of the tour's cancelation, Fiorentino directly addressed the reasons for the stoppage, writing, "I have struggled with anxiety and depression, and it eventually built up to the point where touring … was daunting and unmanageable." The frontman believes, rightly, this degree of honesty was needed to help combat the stigma sometimes associated with mental health and the importance of self-care - a mindset that can be particularly harmful in a field where the concept of the "tortured artist" can still hold powerful sway.

"You don't have to suffer from clinical depression to write powerful or moving music," said Fiorentino, 26, who was born in Western Massachusetts to a nurse mother and a father who worked as a lab technician, and started writing his first songs at age 11. "Elevating the tortured artist, there's a danger it will be romanticized and people will think, 'Oh, if I want to be a songwriter or a musician maybe I should live with this because it will help me create these powerful songs.' And I think that type of attitude is dangerous, and I don't agree with it."

Somos' music has gradually started to reflect this openness, moving from the more abstracted pose Fiorentino adopted as a defense mechanism on earlier efforts.

"I think I worried about exposing too much, and … that's something I still grapple with when I write," said the singer, whose treatment regimen included a combination of therapy and medication. "Working through some of those issues this last year was bound to have some influence, or work its way into the lyrics, and that definitely did happen. I have seen people picking up on more of the themes [on the new record] and I think they're right to do so, because those things are there."