If we're being honest, Vance Joy is about as indie-rock as Mumford & Sons and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, which is to say Joy's an outright pop artist. The Australian songwriter's relentless 2013 single "Riptide" serves as a microcosm of indie as a look as opposed to a genre: it's acoustic-driven, supports a grandiose singalong, exhibits big flashes with a subdued bridge, features a heavy emphasis on downbeat - I could go on. This isn't to say the song isn't powerful (it's a jam really), it's just almost too easy to like.

If we're being honest, Vance Joy is about as indie-rock as Mumford & Sons and Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, which is to say Joy's an outright pop artist. The Australian songwriter's relentless 2013 single "Riptide" serves as a microcosm of indie as a look as opposed to a genre: it's acoustic-driven, supports a grandiose singalong, exhibits big flashes with a subdued bridge, features a heavy emphasis on downbeat - I could go on. This isn't to say the song isn't powerful (it's a jam really), it's just almost too easy to like.

Even if Joy fails at being grisly or under-the-radar, he has some interesting appeal - at least sonically - that connects him to those artists that seem to have the "cred." The intimacy achieved in a song like "Fire and the Flood" echoes Year of Hibernation, the first album from bedroom-pop star Youth Lagoon, and "Play With Fire" could be a cut from Tallest Man on Earth's newest Dark Bird is Home.

I'll quit pandering to blog-rock devotees and say this: Vance Joy's songs do excellent work in turning everyday feels into huge moments, and sometimes it's nice to have music that's easy to relate to.