Look, I've been doing this for a while. I know you probably think you could do my job. I watch movies. You watch movies. I have opinions about them. You have opinions about them.

Look, I've been doing this for a while. I know you probably think you could do my job. I watch movies. You watch movies. I have opinions about them. You have opinions about them.

The real challenge of being a movie critic is having honest opinions that are (hopefully) helpful to people who want to decide what to see. Not every movie you see can be the best movie you've ever seen. Not every movie you see can be the worst movie you've ever seen.

Which brings me to the movie I credit with making me an actual film critic: "Bring It On."

There are certain movies film critics are supposed to like (see: "The Revenant") and certain movies they aren't (see: anything that qualifies as a "guilty pleasure," even though there should be no such thing). You want a challenge as a movie critic? Try going to a movie about competitive cheerleading that you actually really enjoyed and risking your film critic cred by telling people that. Which is exactly what I did back in 2000 with "Bring It On."

This brings me to "The Bronze," a movie that is, as I write this, sitting at 11 percent "rotten" on Rotten Tomatoes (a site which moviegoers rely on way too much, and I say that as a contributing member).

"The Bronze" tells the story of Hope (Melissa Rauch, who also co-wrote the script), a fictional world-class gymnast from Amherst, Ohio, who became America's darling when she landed a bronze medal at the 2004 Olympics despite a major injury.

Flash-forward to today and Hope is a foul-mouthed local celebrity living with her father (Gary Cole) and still getting off (literally, in an uncomfortable, tone-setting opening scene) on her former glories. Hope eventually takes on a local apprentice (Haley Lu Richardson), but she has ulterior motives.

I can see why critics have problems with "The Bronze." Dark comedy doesn't play with everyone, and the overall tone hops around too much. But did I have a blast watching it? Yup.

I bring up "Bring It On" because it shares a similar pedigree. It's hard to tell when the self-seriousness takes itself too seriously and when it's straight comedy. It also reminded me more than a little of "Bad Santa." Does "'Bad Santa' meets 'Bring It On'" sound like a good pitch to you? It does to me.

Rauch is, frankly, great in the lead. Is "The Bronze" perfect? No. But I'm glad I can push that terrible Rotten Tomatoes score up a tiny bit and hopefully get a few more people to see this. Because sometimes it's the movie critics that suck.