After turning heads at the South by Southwest film festival last year, director Trey Edward Shults' bold and original "Krisha" comes to Columbus this week.

After turning heads at the South by Southwest film festival last year, director Trey Edward Shults' bold and original "Krisha" comes to Columbus this week.

Adding to the interest, the film is released by A24 Films, which is, in my humble opinion, the best studio in the world right now, continuing its great recent run with the releases of two of last year's best films, "Ex Machina" and "Room."

"Krisha" is the story of an older woman (Krisha Fairchild, whose unique name gives the film its title) returning to see her extended Texas family on Thanksgiving.

Like many large family reunions, the day is a mix of joviality and underlying tensions. These tensions come to a dramatic head in moments that take the film through some wild shifts in tone.

Those tone shifts won't be for everyone, and those who require tidy narratives probably shouldn't apply either. But Shults makes his directorial debut a challenging stunner that definitely establishes him as a filmmaker to watch.

The casual and natural quality of the family interactions - with a dose of Texas intellectualism - calls to mind Richard Linklater. And while there are more than a few traces of the mumblecore movement, "Krisha" is also visually rich, with camera work that establishes a kind of horror-movie tension.

Fairchild anchors a great and naturalistic cast, as she takes us through Krisha's bold and unpredictable turns. Even with a tidy runtime under an hour and a half, "Krisha" takes a turn in the middle that may make some feel like they just watched two movies. If that were the case, both of them would be worthwhile. Together, it's one of the more challenging - and perhaps rewarding - film-going experiences of the year so far.