Late-afternoon spring air and light were streaming in through garage doors swung open in the bright, handsome space - a former car-and-dog-wash business brilliantly transformed into a post-industrial enclave of hipness. The clear, crisp and delicious, made-on-site pilsner I was sipping was the perfect drink for the occasion. Also perfect: the title of the lilting Black Keys tune "These Days" playing while I enjoyed that pint of Stop 18 ($5) - a beer named for the streetcar drop-off spot that long ago anchored the neighborhood. Welcome to chic Lineage Brewing in contemporary Clintonville.

Late-afternoon spring air and light were streaming in through garage doors swung open in the bright, handsome space - a former car-and-dog-wash business brilliantly transformed into a post-industrial enclave of hipness. The clear, crisp and delicious, made-on-site pilsner I was sipping was the perfect drink for the occasion. Also perfect: the title of the lilting Black Keys tune "These Days" playing while I enjoyed that pint of Stop 18 ($5) - a beer named for the streetcar drop-off spot that long ago anchored the neighborhood. Welcome to chic Lineage Brewing in contemporary Clintonville.

Open about a year, Lineage - which recently made the short list of best new breweries in America picked by BeerAdvocate, a respected and influential national trade magazine - mirrors much of what makes Clintonville so inviting these days. It's smart, fashionable, and exuberant, and it continues to redefine and upgrade itself.

For instance, although you still order at the bar, Lineage has evolved from a craft brewery taproom offering a few snacks to a brewpub that just rolled out a spring menu that includes several interesting appetizers, sandwiches and weekend specials. Spoiler alert: You're still coming here for the beer and ambience, but if you stay for the food, you'll be mostly pleased.

If pilsner isn't your spring fling, worry not, because the beer roster here is versatile and changes frequently (a new cask-conditioned draft is released every Thursday). If you're thirsty and inquisitive, playing the field with a $10 sampler (six five-ounce pours) is the best strategy.

The best food deals are Lineage's sandwiches: three bold and hearty constructions on perfectly toasted, good ciabatta rolls ($9 to $10, served with chips). The best sandwich is the messy but irresistible Miss Dixie Southern-style Meatloaf, in which contrasting garnishes - tangy, rich pimento cheese and aggressively pickled green tomatoes - flatter uncommonly tender slabs of bell pepper-studded meatloaf. My added side of minty, thin green beans ($3) would have benefited from oil, vinegar or a sauce.

Peppery, warm and herby pulled pork, plus a profusion of red cabbage slaw flavored with celery seed, combine for the fine Carol Carib Pork Jerk. Vegan eaters can also score something far-from-boring with the herby and garlicky Purple Dragon veggie sandwich. Heft comes from an under-seasoned white bean puree enlivened by a bright chive pesto; natural sweetness arrives via thick, long-roasted eggplant discs and red peppers.

Soup's on, and like most of Lineage's food, the zesty, pulpy and thick Tomato Bisque ($5) offers rustic allure and modern style, if little finesse. Ditto for the fresh Seasonal Salad ($7) - a bed of mesclun leaves blanketed with diced carrots, cucumbers and a few radishes, all flavored by a garlicky, pasty and unusual dressing.

Pork Belly Lettuce Wraps make a nice - if pricey ($12) - Korean-style beer snack, incorporating three Napa cabbage leaves cradling warm and smoky slab bacon garnished with crushed peanuts and snow peas seasoned with ginger and sesame oil. A little jar of kimchi accompanies the dish.

Show up early on weekends and you can get a citrusy, light, peppery and refreshing Bloody Mary ($7) and Chicken Chilaquiles ($11). The rest of the menu is still available, which is good to know, because by the time my almost-warm chilaquiles arrived with a flavorful red mole sauce but overcooked eggs and negligible chicken, I could've eaten three other courses.

Buttery, flaky, modest-sized, pretty Hand Pies ($9) are also featured - my favorite was the weekend-only breakfast version with soft scrambled eggs, a few cheesy potatoes and first-rate sausage gravy. On the side: nifty, cinnamon-scented, cooked and chilled apples.

Everything isn't perfect at Lineage, but these days, it's sure great to have an ever-better brewpub serving dinner and brunch in ever-better Clintonville.