With more recognition, Torche could be a favorite to be the next stadium-bombarding hard rock phenomenon. That might be an odd statement for diehard followers of the Miami metal band, one that's often given the "sludge" descriptor (in English, this would be a metal subgenre traditionally defined as having harsh vocals yet remaining syrupy-slow in tempo). Save a few outliers willing to receive backlash from metal conservatives (see Deafheaven or Liturgy), metal bands are typically prescriptive to the characteristics of whatever scene they fall into. As opposed to wholly giving its genre the boot, Torche has a way of picking and choosing its moments. And that's when the music hits the hardest.

With more recognition, Torche could be a favorite to be the next stadium-bombarding hard rock phenomenon. That might be an odd statement for diehard followers of the Miami metal band, one that's often given the "sludge" descriptor (in English, this would be a metal subgenre traditionally defined as having harsh vocals yet remaining syrupy-slow in tempo). Save a few outliers willing to receive backlash from metal conservatives (see Deafheaven or Liturgy), metal bands are typically prescriptive to the characteristics of whatever scene they fall into. As opposed to wholly giving its genre the boot, Torche has a way of picking and choosing its moments. And that's when the music hits the hardest.

The band is in town supporting its latest, Restarter, an album that doesn't see a grand aesthetic change for Torche, but reflects a continued desire do things its own way. With cuts like "Annihilation" and "Minions," singer Steve Brooks and Co. channel the likes of Jane's Addiction and Baroness - two bands with a history of cutting through metal culture's clutter. It's in rock's best interest to become stylistically nebulous in this day and age, and Torche is certainly adapting to the times.

Lo-Pan and Kenoma open the show.