Though English singer Ellie Goulding is by no means obscure, it doesn't sit quite right to place her music in the same ranks as that of other pop titans like Madonna or Lady Gaga. For all the popularity and acclaim she's garnered, Goulding has yet to reach that level of ubiquity, which is a shame, because Goulding might be the biggest rock star in modern pop.

Though English singer Ellie Goulding is by no means obscure, it doesn't sit quite right to place her music in the same ranks as that of other pop titans like Madonna or Lady Gaga. For all the popularity and acclaim she's garnered, Goulding has yet to reach that level of ubiquity, which is a shame, because Goulding might be the biggest rock star in modern pop.

Goulding has a kind of crossover appeal that can be attributed to more than just the catchiness of her songs (and they are really catchy). The sounds she's expounded upon - from her debut Lights to last year's Delirium -allow her to serve as a sort of extroverted complement to synth-pop acts like Purity Ring, or shoot, maybe even a singer-songwriter Pictureplane. It also helps that Goulding's choruses don't always focus on what she's singing, but more on how their tones resonate through the rest of your body. (Listen to "Anything Could Happen," and you'll find her music is legitimately infectious down to the core.)

All you get are the jams with Goulding - there's typically no hubbub in her show compared to a normal, arena-filling pop concert. Expect a lengthy set that'll motivate even the most timid of dancers.

Years & Years and Bebe Rexha open the show.