The Woods of Heaven, the 2015 debut full-length from Cleveland post-punk quartet Pleasure Leftists, is largely dark and moody, built on cascading spirals of guitar, anxious drums and singer Haley Morris' downcast, emotive vocals. In an interview last fall, Morris noted her lyrical perspective has gradually grown worldlier, with songs informed by the troubled political and economic climates that have dominated news cycles in recent years.

The Woods of Heaven, the 2015 debut full-length from Cleveland post-punk quartet Pleasure Leftists, is largely dark and moody, built on cascading spirals of guitar, anxious drums and singer Haley Morris' downcast, emotive vocals. In an interview last fall, Morris noted her lyrical perspective has gradually grown worldlier, with songs informed by the troubled political and economic climates that have dominated news cycles in recent years.

"As you try and find your place in the world, you learn more about the world," she said at the time.

It's not a bright picture, either, judging by the band's cloudy musical output. Regardless, the songs do maintain a sliver of hope amidst the near-unending wreckage - "We can survive," Morris sings with a glint of optimism on one tune - a feeling that should be familiar to most Cleveland sports aficionados. (For real though, Cavs fans, this could be your year!).

Dana, Raw Pony and American Jobs open the show.