Dumpsters hold a special place in the hearts of local radio personalities Brett Payne and Bryan Quinby. It's a prop they keep coming back to in their promotional materials, from Quinby's Twitter profile picture - he's hanging upside down from a dumpster's rim - to their photo shoot for Alive.

Dumpsters hold a special place in the hearts of local radio personalities Brett Payne and Bryan Quinby. It's a prop they keep coming back to in their promotional materials, from Quinby's Twitter profile picture - he's hanging upside down from a dumpster's rim - to their photo shoot for Alive.

"I always see us as useless to capitalists," said Quinby, who will appear with Payne in a comedy show at Kafe Kerouac on Friday, June 10. "So we're trash. Basically, we're garbage."

Opposition to capitalism is part of Payne and Quinby's brand of "anarcho-comedy," which they bring to their Sunday radio show, "Street Fight." The duo has been broadcasting on Columbus community station WCRS FM since 2011. They also record a separate podcast each week.

"We kinda went through a radicalizing process in 2012," Quinby said. "And once we started to look into anarchism, [we found that] there's a bunch of books, and there's a lot of people on Twitter, but they're very humorless." And so they decided to fill that void.

Humor aside, Payne and Quinby are serious about their vision for a society without "hierarchy," or, according to Payne, "moving away from thinking that we have authority over anyone but ourselves."

And while anarchy often conjures up images of violent and angry dissidents spreading chaos, Payne and Quinby have a different, more people-focused approach.

"If I can tell [the audience] to love everybody and to take care of your neighbors … then that's my calling," said Payne, who also joked about rewriting the Constitution each month. "We're trying to get people [food] and shelter. We don't care about property rights."

The comedians cover a variety of topics ranging from movies and pro-wrestling to relationship advice and, of course, politics - but you won't hear any rants. They believe their material can be enjoyed by anyone, but intentionally strive to provide news for "regular people."

"When we named the show … the word 'street' was so important because … we wanna be the equivalent of the guy telling you what's going on at the bus stop," Quinby said.

"My mom was a Denny's waitress and my dad was a bricklayer," said Payne, who spent his childhood on the North Side and in Reynoldsburg. "[The TV show] 'Roseanne' was the last time I felt like I saw myself in mainstream media."

After high school, Payne worked in clothing stores and later as a social media manager for an insurance website. Now married with a three-year-old daughter, he is a full-time stay-at-home dad, which some still view as a radical choice. "I've been called weak and a sissy … but my wife is perfectly happy," Payne said. He currently lives in D.C. - he does "Street Fight" remotely - but plans to move back to Columbus.

Quinby, on the other hand, has lived in the Columbus area all his life. "I was a delinquent kid," he said of his time growing up in Groveport. "I have a yearbook where one of my teachers drew bars over my picture and said that I was gonna end up in [the] Lucasville prison."

Quinby spent most of his 20s "popping pills and running around." He worked at a cable company for seven years. After getting robbed at gunpoint on the job and breaking his wrist escaping, he also spent time as a stay-at-home father to his daughter, now 11. After kicking an opioid addiction, he graduated from Ohio State with a degree in sociology. He'd like to teach high school students in juvenile detention centers.

"I want to show kids that somebody has a commitment to them," he said.

In the meantime, Payne and Quinby's focus is on their comedy. Fans can expect some new additions to the radio show, including guest appearances by the hosts' wives.

One thing they will not do is put their content behind a paywall. They may consider running ads on the podcast, but they are unwilling to promote a product just for the sake of money. For now, they accept donations via PayPal and crowd-funding platform Patreon.

After Kafe Kerouac, they hope to bring their show to other venues in the tri-state area and beyond.

"It's a lot of gallows humor, but you will laugh," Quinby said of the show.

"We're just really trying to make new friends and get everybody to party together," Payne added.

As for a concrete step to create a more equal society? The duo came up with an idea for a state-managed "foreign-car library."

"You would have access to like a Lamborghini or a Ferrari for one week," Payne said. "But instead of having some CEO or Jay Leno lock it up in some garage … everyone gets a shot at the throttle … that's the type of system that I'm looking for."

* * *

Name: Brett Payne

Age: 32

Day Job: Stay-at-home dad

Hometown: North Side

Current Neighborhood: Washington, D.C.

Currently listening to: In Cold Blood and Chance the Rapper

Favorite Restaurant in Columbus: Dirty Franks

Favorite Movie: "I Heart Huckabees"

Favorite TV show: "Nashville"

What is your favorite way to cool down in the summer? Mango Lassi

* * *

Name: Bryan Quinby

Age: 37

Day Job: Shipping job and driving for Lyft

Hometown: Groveport

Current Neighborhood: Grandview

Currently listening to: "The newly freed Gucci Mane."

Favorite Restaurant in Columbus: La Tavola

Favorite Movie: "Fast Five"

Favorite TV show: "Banshee"

What is your favorite way to cool down in the summer? Lying on the air conditioner vent.