It's been 13 years since Pixar's delightful "Finding Nemo," and while it wasn't a movie that really called for a sequel, here we are, because Hollywood.

It's been 13 years since Pixar's delightful "Finding Nemo," and while it wasn't a movie that really called for a sequel, here we are, because Hollywood.

"Finding Dory" shifts the focus to the breakout supporting fish from "Nemo," voiced by Ellen DeGeneres, and treads similar waters and themes. The real question, of course, is whether it can live up to its lofty predecessor.

Pixar movies are known to hit audiences right in the feels, but "Dory" does it right out of the gate (just like "Up"). We meet a young Dory as her parents are teaching her how to stay safe with her peculiar disorder. "Hi, I'm Dory," the younger fish recites. "I suffer from short-term memory loss."

If Dory's memory issue was a quirk and sometimes punchline in the first movie, here it's treated with more emotional depth. As little Dory is separated from her parents, her predicament takes on a lot more weight.

Flash forward to after the events of "Nemo" and we find Dory and her pals Marlin (Albert Brooks) and Nemo (Hayden Rolence) are still getting along swimmingly. But when a faint memory of her parents is triggered, Dory decides to venture out in search of them.

Based on the high standard of "Nemo," it's perhaps not a surprise that "Dory" is often enchanting and still a bit disappointing. "Nemo" director Andrew Stanton returns and shows reverence to the characters and the immersive nature of the sea - which is rendered really well in the 3-D presentation.

Where things get sticky is when he takes his fish out of water, and I mean that literally. Much of "Dory" takes place in a Sea World-esque theme park and aquarium called the Marine Life Institute. And visiting a virtual theme park isn't quite as awe-inspiring as the deep blue sea.

"Dory" also spins its wheels a bit on elaborate journeys that take the characters out of the water a lot more than you would expect (and a lot more than even cartoon logic would allow), and new characters don't seem to manage quite the same charm.

This sequel is certainly more than just a shameless cash-in on one of Pixar's finest films, but it's also not quite up to the studio's highest standards.