Just after Memphis rocker Jimmy Lee Lindsey, better known by the stage name Jay Reatard, formed the Reatards and released seminal punk-rock album Teenage Hate on Goner Records in 1998, he started another band with his girlfriend, Alicja Trout.

Just after Memphis rocker Jimmy Lee Lindsey, better known by the stage name Jay Reatard, formed the Reatards and released seminal punk-rock album Teenage Hate on Goner Records in 1998, he started another band with his girlfriend, Alicja Trout.

"Jay had songs that he didn't think were right for the Reatards," Trout said recently by phone. "We knew we wanted keyboards in there."

With drummer Rich Crook, Trout and Lyndsey formed Lost Sounds, which became Lindsey's primary musical outlet on a handful of albums from 1999 through 2005. With Trout on keys and Lindsey on guitar, the pair shared vocal and songwriting duties, creating supremely intense, dark-wave synth-punk influenced by the trio's diverse tastes: Devo, the Screamers, black metal and Prince.

"Everybody liked things that were not cool within the [Memphis] scene," Trout said. "We were so into trying each other's ideas that it was like, anything goes. There was no formula."

But while the creative partnership between Trout and Lindsey flourished ("He's a perfect songwriter," Trout said), the live shows were unpredictable and even dangerous. Lindsey, who died in his home in 2010 with cocaine and alcohol in his system, was notorious for his outbursts and onstage antics. (Here in Columbus, he berated some moshers at a Summit show a couple of months before his death.)

"It's hard for me to judge what was going on with Jay since he can't speak up for himself now, but I felt like he was having a lot of mental anxiety, and it was hard to play with him onstage," Trout said. "He would be violent and jealous and leave the stage and have freakouts that were really frustrating and irritating. He was a firecracker. You never knew when you were going to set him off.

"It does not feel good when someone is trying to hit you with a mic stand onstage. If you stood up to him and spoke up for yourself, a large piece of equipment would be thrown at you. If his cable came unplugged, it was somebody in the band's fault. Or if the drummer is playing and a stick breaks and flies away and he can't grab his other stick in time, then the drummer is about to get his drum set kicked over by Jay. It was really unpleasant."

Trout and Lindsey's relationship eventually fell apart, and Lost Sounds followed suit, ending in 2005 after the band was kicked out of a house in Stuttgart, Germany in the middle of the night. A Lost Sounds reunion never looked promising, and after Lindsey's death, it became impossible.

Trout went on to tour in other bands (River City Tanlines, Black Sunday, Mouserocket) and release music as Alicja-Pop, but when she saw Memphis bands like the Oblivians reunite, she grew sad that she'd never play those Lost Sounds songs again. Then drummer Rich Crook got in touch.

"Rich was like, 'I really wanna play drums again, so I'm just putting it out there that maybe sometime we can do these [Lost Sounds] songs again,'" Trout said. "We put the idea on the backburner and let it simmer for a long time."

Last winter, Trout and Crook wrote and recorded four songs together and named the rebooted project Sweet Knives after a song on Lost Sounds' 2004 EP Future Touch. The pair later recruited former Lost Sounds guitarist John Garland and brought in Johnny Valiant to play bass, then booked a nine-date tour that will swing by Ace of Cups on Wednesday, Aug. 10. The shows will feature the new songs, out this month as a double 7-inch on Red Lounge Records, plus some of Trout's Lost Sounds material.

In this new version of the old band, things are relationally easier. In Lost Sounds, Trout said Lindsey made the dual songwriting dynamic a competition. "I was always like, 'You win the competition, Jay. You've always won it. You're always going to get more attention, and I'm not trying to compete with you on that,'" she said. "It was not my thing."

Now Trout, a 45-year-old mother of two, relishes the band dynamic in Sweet Knives. "Everyone's good at what they do, and the personalities are easygoing," she said. "It's been therapeutic for me, as an aging musician, to be able to do these old songs and have them come off, I think, better than they used to come off."

As for the future of Sweet Knives, Trout said she'd like to record more songs and maybe tour Europe. But for now she's content to play some shows and to continue defying rock 'n' roll expectations.

"If people are hearing us for the first time and don't know anything about us, they're gonna be super confused," she said. "They won't know what kind of band we are."