On "Throbbing Lung Fiber," a track that falls near the middle of Full of Hell's 2013 sophomore LP, Rudiments of Mutilation, singer Dylan Walker hurls his tortured words as though skin is being melted from bone. His delivery is fitting considering the subject matter, as the song recounts the grisly aftermath of a family incinerated in a house fire, all charred bodies, cooked marrow and lingering scent of burned hair.

On "Throbbing Lung Fiber," a track that falls near the middle of Full of Hell's 2013 sophomore LP, Rudiments of Mutilation, singer Dylan Walker hurls his tortured words as though skin is being melted from bone. His delivery is fitting considering the subject matter, as the song recounts the grisly aftermath of a family incinerated in a house fire, all charred bodies, cooked marrow and lingering scent of burned hair.

"I like when the words are melodious but the message is kind of awful," said Walker, 26, who joins his bandmates for a concert at the Summit on Sunday, Aug. 7. It's an approach that surfaces in merciless/melodious "Lung Fiber" lines like, "Gas escapes from withering cavities/ Nerves howl and ache in such sweet melody."

Both lyrically and musically, the bandmates in Full of Hell - guitarist Spencer Hazard, drummer David Bland and bassist Sam DiGristine round out the current lineup - are drawn toward extremes, favoring blistering tempos, grinding instrumentals and growled, grizzled vocals that sound largely inhuman, like David Naughton recorded amid his beastly transition in "An American Werewolf in London."

"I'm not under any illusion about people understanding what I'm saying or reading into the lyrics or getting a message," Walker said. "But I love singing this style, and I enjoy making the most alien sounds come out of my throat as I possibly can. Sometimes I'm trying to wretch in such a weird way that it doesn't really sound like words, which is fun for me."

Over the course of Full of Hell's existence, the band has pushed deeper into extreme territory, owing both to the bandmates' elevated skillsets - "I don't think we could have handled playing the way we do now [in the early days]," Walker said - and their interest in sounds that exist on the noisier fringes.

"I love things that go all the way," Walker said. "When I discovered grindcore, it was perfect. It was still punk, but it was sonically insane. Then noise was even better. It was like the freebase form of everything extreme. It was completely sonically harsh."

On more recent efforts, Full of Hell has invited along sonic copilots, pairing with Japanese noise collective Merzbow for Full of Hell & Merzbow, from 2014, and explosive duo the Body for this year's One Day You Will Ache Like I Ache, a punishing, distorted assault that manages to live up to its bruised and battered name.

Both collaborations pushed the band to explore new approaches, embracing more improvisation in lieu of the studied, surgical tack it adopted on previous releases. In addition, the added attention the musicians garnered working with Merzbow helped them learn that sometimes it's best to feign ignorance when it comes to dealing with critics.

"We hadn't done anything as high profile as that to that point, so to us it was kind of shocking and disheartening to have people on the internet say we did a terrible job. It really hurt our little feelings at the time," Walker said, and laughed. "But that needed to happen. We needed to realize if we were going to do things out of the box or try to get involved in scenes as insular as the noise scene, we had to be ready for people to shit on us. We're a little more tempered to that now."